risus sardonicus


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Related to risus sardonicus: tetanus

risus

 [ri´sus] (L.)
laughter.
risus sardo´nicus a grinning expression produced by spasm of the facial muscles; seen in tetanus and certain types of poisoning.

ri·sus ca·ni·nus

(rī'sŭs kā-nī'nŭs),
the semblance of a grin caused by facial spasm, seen especially in tetanus but also in some kinds of poisoning.
[L. risus, laugh + caninus, doglike]

risus sardonicus

[särdon′ikəs]
Etymology: L, laughter; Gk, sardonius, mocking
a wry masklike grin caused by spasm of the facial muscles, as seen in tetanus.
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Risus sardonicus
A fixed ‘sarcastic’ grimace and anxious expression with drawing up of the eyebrows and corners of the mouth due to spasms of the masseter and other facial muscles, accompanied by rigidity of neck and trunk muscles and arching of back; the RS is seen in generalised tetanus, and caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani, a soil contaminant with a 7–10 day incubation
Prognosis Up to 90% mortality in the unvaccinated and/or susceptible population—e.g., narcotic addicts

risus sardonicus

A fixed 'sarcastic' grimace and anxious expression with drawing up of the eyebrows and corners of the mouth due to spasms of the masseter and other facial muscles, accompanied by rigidity of neck and trunk muscles and arching of back; the RS  is seen in generalized tetanus, and caused by a neurotoxin produced by.Clostridium tetani, a soil contaminant with a 7-10 day incubation Prognosis Up to 90% mortality in the unvaccinated/susceptible–eg, narcotic addicts

risus sardonicus

A characteristic facial expression, as of a sardonic grin, caused by spasm of the muscles of the forehead and the corners of the mouth in acute TETANUS.

risus

[L.] laughter.

risus sardonicus
a grinning expression produced by spasm of the facial muscles, typical of tetanus in humans. The term is also applied to dogs with tetanus in which the lips are drawn back by muscle spasms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The impact on the facial muscles produces a particular characteristic feature called risus sardonicus, or "sardonic grin," in which the angles of the mouth are drawn down, exposing taught clenched teeth.
Perhaps Shakespeare's version of the Gothic romance's risus sardonicus in Macbeth says it most clearly: "There's daggers in men's smiles.