risk

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Related to riskiness: riskier

risk

 [risk]
a danger or hazard; the probability of suffering harm.
attributable risk the amount or proportion of incidence of disease or death (or risk of disease or death) in individuals exposed to a specific risk factor that can be attributed to exposure to that factor; the difference in the risk for unexposed versus exposed individuals.
empiric risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family based solely on experience rather than on knowledge of the causative mechanism. See also genetic risk.
genetic risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family, based on knowledge of its genetic pattern of transmission. See also empiric risk.
relative risk for a disease, death, or other outcome, the ratio of the incidence rate among individuals with a given risk factor to the incidence rate among those without it.

risk

(risk), In idiomatic English one is at risk of, not for, a disease, injury, or other untoward event. Avoid redundant phrases such a possible risk and potential risk; an element of uncertainty is inherent in the meaning of the word.
The probability that an event will occur.

risk

(rĭsk)
n.
The possibility of suffering harm or loss; danger.

risk′er n.

risk

EBM
In clinical trials, a term referring to the possibility of harm or discomfort for study participants.

risk

Epidemiology The chance or likelihood that an undesirable event or effect will occur, as a result of use or nonuse, incidence, or influence of a chemical, physical, or biologic agent, especially during a stated period; the probability of developing a given disease over a specified time period. See Minimal risk Managed care The chance or possibility of loss. See Risk sharing Occupational medicine A value determined by the potential severity of the hazard and the frequency of exposure to the 'risky' substance or activity, usually understood to mean the probability of suffering from a particular disease Risk assessment The probability that something will cause injury, combined with the potential severity of that injury. See Absolute risk, Acceptable risk, Assigned risk, Attributable risk, Cancer risk, Cardiac risk, Dread risk, Hazard risk rating, High risk/high impact, Incremental risk, Lifetime risk, No significant risk, Nonattributable risk, Thick conception of risk, Thin conception of risk, Unknown risk.
Risks of disease
Infection
HBV  1:63,000
HCV 1:103,000
HIV 1:493,000
HTLV I/II 1:641,000
HAV  1:1,000,000
Other morbid conditions
MVA 1:6,700
Flood 1:450,000
Earthquake 1:600,000
Lightning 1:1,000,000

risk

(risk)
1. The probability that an event will occur.
2. The possibility of adverse consequences.

risk

reasoned judgement of the likelihood of, and/or effects of, adverse events occurring, in relation to clinical practice or work environment

risk,

n the possible peril related to a particular condition or treatment. The risk may come directly from the condition itself or indirectly from the process or method involved in the treatment application.

risk

(risk)
Probability that an event will occur.

risk

the chance of an unfavorable event occurring.

acceptable risk
risk for which the benefits rank larger than the potential hazards.
at risk
that part of a total population which is subject to the disease being reviewed, e.g. only milking cows are at risk to milk fever, only grazing cows to enzootic nasal granuloma.
risk aversion
reluctance to take risks.
risk factor
an attribute or exposure which increases the probability of occurrence of a disease or other outcome.
risk premium
the amount of money required to convince a person to take a specific risk.
risk ratio
the ratio of two risks.
relative risk
see relative risk.
specified risk materials
a term used in the US to denote tissues that can be infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), namely brain and spinal cord, spinal ganglia, retina, and terminal small intestine. Banned from inclusion in any feed stuff.
surgical risk
an animal that has poor general health and must be assessed as a poor survival risk to undergo major surgery or anesthesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, to the extent that energy crop yields have a relatively low or negative correlation with corn/soybeans, their production can diversify the crop portfolio and potentially reduce overall riskiness of crop production.
According to Simunic and Stein (1990) "the riskiness of an audit engagement is properly defined and measured within a portfolio context" (3) since the outcome of every client acceptance or continuance decision has an impact on the riskiness of the audit firm clients' portfolio en bloc (Huss and Jacobs, 1991).
One puzzle is what determines the split between increased roundaboutness and increased riskiness for any given reduction in interest rates below the natural rate.
Insurance companies and pension funds that are regulated at the state level rely on ratings agencies to assess the riskiness of their enormous bond portfolios.
In this way, the ranking of scores in terms of consumers' riskiness is always preserved.
Foreign shareholders appear to appreciate strong creditor rights that potentially mitigate the riskiness of projects, while bondholders arc negatively affected by strong shareholder rights that could induce the firm to engage in risky asset investments.
In a speech in New York, Mr King called for more to be done to reduce riskiness in banking and solve the so-called "too important to fail" problem - that is having institutions which receive financial assistance from the Government when they are on the brink of collapse.
Succinctly stated, the DoL viewed the riskiness of inadequate benefits at the end of a working career as being more important than the riskiness of stock and bond market volatility in the short term.
Getting quotes from a variety of carriers is important because many companies on the standard car insurance market seek out clients with low-to-moderate levels of riskiness and will charge steep prices to compensate; but shoppers who cannot secure a policy from these companies can turn to what has come to be known as the "non-standard market.
Participants also noted that they expected the riskiness in the banking sector to decrease and interest rates to remain stable.
Mr Healy said the Basel 2 capital rules, an international standard for banking regulators that intended to recognise the relative riskiness of lending, had created an incentive to lend the marginal dollar more towards the household sector than towards the business sector.
The purpose of this study is to identify reliable measures of stocks riskiness that allows investors to avoid the repercussions of market downturns by making better informed decisions.