risk

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risk

 [risk]
a danger or hazard; the probability of suffering harm.
attributable risk the amount or proportion of incidence of disease or death (or risk of disease or death) in individuals exposed to a specific risk factor that can be attributed to exposure to that factor; the difference in the risk for unexposed versus exposed individuals.
empiric risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family based solely on experience rather than on knowledge of the causative mechanism. See also genetic risk.
genetic risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family, based on knowledge of its genetic pattern of transmission. See also empiric risk.
relative risk for a disease, death, or other outcome, the ratio of the incidence rate among individuals with a given risk factor to the incidence rate among those without it.

risk

(risk), In idiomatic English one is at risk of, not for, a disease, injury, or other untoward event. Avoid redundant phrases such a possible risk and potential risk; an element of uncertainty is inherent in the meaning of the word.
The probability that an event will occur.

risk

(rĭsk)
n.
The possibility of suffering harm or loss; danger.

risk′er n.

risk

EBM
In clinical trials, a term referring to the possibility of harm or discomfort for study participants.

risk

Epidemiology The chance or likelihood that an undesirable event or effect will occur, as a result of use or nonuse, incidence, or influence of a chemical, physical, or biologic agent, especially during a stated period; the probability of developing a given disease over a specified time period. See Minimal risk Managed care The chance or possibility of loss. See Risk sharing Occupational medicine A value determined by the potential severity of the hazard and the frequency of exposure to the 'risky' substance or activity, usually understood to mean the probability of suffering from a particular disease Risk assessment The probability that something will cause injury, combined with the potential severity of that injury. See Absolute risk, Acceptable risk, Assigned risk, Attributable risk, Cancer risk, Cardiac risk, Dread risk, Hazard risk rating, High risk/high impact, Incremental risk, Lifetime risk, No significant risk, Nonattributable risk, Thick conception of risk, Thin conception of risk, Unknown risk.
Risks of disease
Infection
HBV  1:63,000
HCV 1:103,000
HIV 1:493,000
HTLV I/II 1:641,000
HAV  1:1,000,000
Other morbid conditions
MVA 1:6,700
Flood 1:450,000
Earthquake 1:600,000
Lightning 1:1,000,000

risk

(risk)
1. The probability that an event will occur.
2. The possibility of adverse consequences.

risk

reasoned judgement of the likelihood of, and/or effects of, adverse events occurring, in relation to clinical practice or work environment

risk,

n the possible peril related to a particular condition or treatment. The risk may come directly from the condition itself or indirectly from the process or method involved in the treatment application.

risk

(risk)
Probability that an event will occur.

risk

the chance of an unfavorable event occurring.

acceptable risk
risk for which the benefits rank larger than the potential hazards.
at risk
that part of a total population which is subject to the disease being reviewed, e.g. only milking cows are at risk to milk fever, only grazing cows to enzootic nasal granuloma.
risk aversion
reluctance to take risks.
risk factor
an attribute or exposure which increases the probability of occurrence of a disease or other outcome.
risk premium
the amount of money required to convince a person to take a specific risk.
risk ratio
the ratio of two risks.
relative risk
see relative risk.
specified risk materials
a term used in the US to denote tissues that can be infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), namely brain and spinal cord, spinal ganglia, retina, and terminal small intestine. Banned from inclusion in any feed stuff.
surgical risk
an animal that has poor general health and must be assessed as a poor survival risk to undergo major surgery or anesthesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The whistleblower also said building societies had been left vulnerable by branching into other riskier lending sectors, such as the buy-to-let and commercial property sectors.
Before the VaxGen trial began, there were fears that not enough volunteers could be recruited, that many would drop out of the three-year test, and that some would engage in riskier sexual behavior than before, thinking they might have vaccine protection.
Actually, knowing that your comments are going to be seen in six weeks is riskier than an immediate release.
The higher up the pyramid, the more risky investments become; but the riskier the investment, the greater the return, especially if you educate yourself and are able to weather the ups and downs of the market.
While the mainstream press has flouted the high salaries of big earners, CEO turnover is also on the rise--suggesting that CEOs are under perennial scrutiny and the top job is riskier than ever.
For example, imagine that firm A and firm B have identical control structures with respect to an audit objective or account, but that firm A is inherently riskier than firm B.
The authors find that investors associate sinking fund provisions in municipal revenue bonds with riskier projects or riskier issuers, either of which results in increased borrowing costs for issuers.
Men took the riskier bet, women the insurance option.
They conclude that Y is riskier than X if G, the cumulative distribution of Y, can be formed from F, the cumulative distribution of X, by adding a series of mean preserving spread (MPS) steps to F.
This unusual environment encouraged some investors to adopt riskier positions to boost the returns they were getting or to reduce the costs of borrowing.
These figures may be conservative because commercial banks made relatively more construction loans than life insurance companies: these loans tend to be riskier than long-term mortgages.
The willingness-to-accept approach calculates the value of a life by using a hedonic wage equation designed to reveal the additional compensation necessary to lure individuals into riskier lines of work.