marker

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marker

 [mahr´ker]
something that identifies or that is used to identify; see also determinant.
cell-surface marker an antigenic determinant found on the surface of a specific type of cell.
tumor marker a biochemical substance indicative of presence of a tumor; ideally, it should be specific, sensitive, and proportional to tumor load. Called also biomarker.

mark·er

(mark'ĕr),
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A characteristic or factor by which a cell or molecule can be recognized or identified.
3. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes, that facilitate linkage analysis.

marker

/mark·er/ (mahrk´er) something that identifies or that is used to identify.
tumor marker  a biochemical substance indicative of neoplasia, ideally specific, sensitive, and proportional to tumor load.

marker

(mär′kər)
n.
1. A biomarker.
2. A genetic marker.

marker

Medspeak
A value or indicator of the presence of a disease.

Molecular biology
An identifiable physical location on a chromosome (e.g., restriction enzyme cutting site, gene, minisatellite, microsatellite), the inheritance of which can be monitored. Markers can be an expressed region of DNA (gene encoding a protein) or a segment of DNA with no known coding function but whose pattern of inheritance can be determined. A marker can be localised to a specific region of the genome (e.g., all markers on the human transcript map are STSs).

Markers have also been defined as a genetic trait, of which one allelic form is selected or screened for after recombination. 

Suicidology
A potential physiologic indicator or predictor of an increased risk of suicide, the most promising of which is a decrease in serotonin in the brain.

marker

Internal medicine A diagnostic indicator for presence of a disease. See Biomarker, Bone marker, Breast marker, Cardiac marker, Cell marker, Cell surface marker, Gene marker, Genetic marker, Kinesic marker, Microsatellite marker, Pan B-cell marker, Pan T-cell marker, Selectable marker, Selected marker, Surface marker, Surrogate marker, Tumor marker.

mark·er

(mahrk'ĕr)
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A characteristic or factor by which a cell or molecule can be recognized or identified.
3. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes that facilitate linkage analysis.

marker

1. A trait, condition, gene, or substance that indicates the presence of, or a probable increased predisposition to, a medical or psychological disorder.
2. A gene whose location on a chromosome is known so that it can be used as a point of reference for MAPPING new mutations.

marker

see GENETIC MARKER.

mark·er

(mahrk'ĕr)
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes, which facilitate linkage analysis

marker

a visual or electronic signal that permits identification and therefore sorting of individual items from a group.

marker animals
males or teasers wearing chin-ball or siresine harness so that females mounted are marked by crayon or paint.
marker genes
genes with a known location on a chromosome and an obvious phenotype which are used as reference points when mapping other genes.
histochemical marker
marking of cells or tissues based on a chemical identification of the contents; the location of specific chemical substances in particular locations is marked by the installation of an electronic or color signal.

Patient discussion about marker

Q. what is a safe tumor marker number range?

A. depends on the marker...most of the markers are materials that found normally in our body. and there are a number of markers and their levels differentiate. what marker do you mean?

Q. My wife(53) has elevated CEA and CA19.9 levels - near 150, without any concomitant reason/observation? Comment

A. Hi Bobby3,

The most important question is why were these tests done?
An elevated level may result from many causes, some of them are simple and some are more problematic. IMHO the best thing would be consulting her doctor to consider the need to check-up her alimentary system.
You can read more here (http://www.ascocancerfoundation.org/patient/ASCO+Resources/Patient+Guides/ASCO+Patient+Guide:+Tumor+Markers+for+Gastrointestinal+Cancers) and here (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Detection/tumor-markers)

More discussions about marker
References in periodicals archive ?
Although hsCRP is the only novel risk marker currently endorsed by the NACB, other biomarkers may provide significant predictive power, warranting future studies.
Plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as a major risk marker for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria.
Only a small proportion of the deaths in this category are defined by high risk markers such as low ejection fraction and ventricular arrhythmias.
The article, "HDL No Risk Marker When LDL Was Very Low," FAMILY PRACTICE NEWS, Sept.
AUC for all derived HPLC variables except for Ls (small LDL + very small LDL) was larger than that for traditional risk marker, and Vs + Ls Hs produced the largest AUC.
A substantial body of evidence published in peer-reviewed journals, including more than 25 prospective population-based studies, supports Lp-PLA2 as a cardiovascular risk marker that provides new information, over and above traditional risk factors, to help uncover hidden heart attack and stroke risk.
We have shown that individuals who have above-average levels of a protein called SFRP4 in the blood are five times more likely to develop diabetes in the next few years than those with below-average levels," Anders Rosengren, a researcher at the Lund University Diabetes Centre (LUDC), who led the work on the risk marker, said.
We tested whether leptin may be an independent risk marker for stroke in a case-referent study.
Low cholesterol may be a risk factor for aggressive behavior, a risk marker for other biologic substances or genotypes that predispose to such behavior, or a biologic marker for poor prognosis.
The strong connection also means it is appropriate to use neurotensin as a clinical risk marker for the conditions, in the view of the researchers.
Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2: a risk marker or a risk factor?

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