marker

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marker

 [mahr´ker]
something that identifies or that is used to identify; see also determinant.
cell-surface marker an antigenic determinant found on the surface of a specific type of cell.
tumor marker a biochemical substance indicative of presence of a tumor; ideally, it should be specific, sensitive, and proportional to tumor load. Called also biomarker.

mark·er

(mark'ĕr),
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A characteristic or factor by which a cell or molecule can be recognized or identified.
3. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes, that facilitate linkage analysis.

marker

/mark·er/ (mahrk´er) something that identifies or that is used to identify.
tumor marker  a biochemical substance indicative of neoplasia, ideally specific, sensitive, and proportional to tumor load.

marker

(mär′kər)
n.
1. A biomarker.
2. A genetic marker.

marker

Medspeak
A value or indicator of the presence of a disease.

Molecular biology
An identifiable physical location on a chromosome (e.g., restriction enzyme cutting site, gene, minisatellite, microsatellite), the inheritance of which can be monitored. Markers can be an expressed region of DNA (gene encoding a protein) or a segment of DNA with no known coding function but whose pattern of inheritance can be determined. A marker can be localised to a specific region of the genome (e.g., all markers on the human transcript map are STSs).

Markers have also been defined as a genetic trait, of which one allelic form is selected or screened for after recombination. 

Suicidology
A potential physiologic indicator or predictor of an increased risk of suicide, the most promising of which is a decrease in serotonin in the brain.

marker

Internal medicine A diagnostic indicator for presence of a disease. See Biomarker, Bone marker, Breast marker, Cardiac marker, Cell marker, Cell surface marker, Gene marker, Genetic marker, Kinesic marker, Microsatellite marker, Pan B-cell marker, Pan T-cell marker, Selectable marker, Selected marker, Surface marker, Surrogate marker, Tumor marker.

mark·er

(mahrk'ĕr)
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A characteristic or factor by which a cell or molecule can be recognized or identified.
3. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes that facilitate linkage analysis.

marker

1. A trait, condition, gene, or substance that indicates the presence of, or a probable increased predisposition to, a medical or psychological disorder.
2. A gene whose location on a chromosome is known so that it can be used as a point of reference for MAPPING new mutations.

marker

see GENETIC MARKER.

mark·er

(mahrk'ĕr)
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes, which facilitate linkage analysis

marker

a visual or electronic signal that permits identification and therefore sorting of individual items from a group.

marker animals
males or teasers wearing chin-ball or siresine harness so that females mounted are marked by crayon or paint.
marker genes
genes with a known location on a chromosome and an obvious phenotype which are used as reference points when mapping other genes.
histochemical marker
marking of cells or tissues based on a chemical identification of the contents; the location of specific chemical substances in particular locations is marked by the installation of an electronic or color signal.

Patient discussion about marker

Q. what is a safe tumor marker number range?

A. depends on the marker...most of the markers are materials that found normally in our body. and there are a number of markers and their levels differentiate. what marker do you mean?

Q. My wife(53) has elevated CEA and CA19.9 levels - near 150, without any concomitant reason/observation? Comment

A. Hi Bobby3,

The most important question is why were these tests done?
An elevated level may result from many causes, some of them are simple and some are more problematic. IMHO the best thing would be consulting her doctor to consider the need to check-up her alimentary system.
You can read more here (http://www.ascocancerfoundation.org/patient/ASCO+Resources/Patient+Guides/ASCO+Patient+Guide:+Tumor+Markers+for+Gastrointestinal+Cancers) and here (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Detection/tumor-markers)

More discussions about marker
References in periodicals archive ?
The research interest in risk markers in general, and biochemical risk markers in particular, has exploded in the last 2 decades.
12) Of course, to the extent that an enrollee has been with an issuer for a short period of time, his risk score will be measured imprecisely, but can still be constructed to be unbiased, even if risk markers are defined hierarchically.
A risk marker that could be used to screen these patients so that effective intervention could be initiated early on, would be invaluable.
30) Evidence supports the association of PAI-1 with the development of type 2 diabetes independent of body fat and insulin resistance, suggesting that it maybe an early risk marker.
Blood pressure is a clear example of a risk marker because it is causally related to CV disease and the reduction in blood pressure induced by an antihypertensive agent is related to the degree of CV risk reduction (2).
Although conventional epidemiologic risk markers provide valuable statements about population risk, especially for the development of coronary heart disease, individual risk prediction still remains the major limitation for applying clinically preventive strategies.
Prior research has shown that sensitivity to the stimulating effects of alcohol and other drugs is a risk marker for heavy or problematic use of those substances.
Furthermore, based on the role adiponectin plays in insulin signaling and the presence of adiponectin receptors in neurological tissue, we hypothesized that adiponectin contributes to or serves as a risk marker for the development of all-cause dementia and AD," wrote Dr.
Fourth, the use of hsCRP in intermediate-risk groups has been endorsed by the CDC and the AHA (14), and a recent comprehensive review of novel risk markers from the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry found hsCRP to be the only emerging risk marker with appropriate characteristics for clinical use (15).
Due to budgetary constraints, physicians are also unlikely to utilise all the existing cardiac risk markers, even if required, and will have to limit diagnostic tests to the application of only one risk marker.
More than showing an association of the KRAS-variant with triple-negative breast cancer in premenopausal women, the study clearly shows a novel association of this inherited risk marker and tumor biology," stated Joanne Weidhaas, M.

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