ring fenced

ring fenced

Medspeak-UK
adjective Intended for a particular use; dedicated; protected from another use, especially referring to funds intended for a specific public initiative or body—e.g., local strategic health authorities and hospitals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stephen Hester, chief executive at Royal Bank of Scotland(LON: RBS), has said that forcing ring fencing leads people to believe that in case of a crisis, the ring fenced banks would somehow always be bailed out, according to a Reuters report.
According to restructuring documents obtained by press in July, Dubai World said it is prepared to sell prized assets including previously ring fenced ports firm DP World in a bid to raise as much as $19.
4 billion, five-year debt tranche would be financed by its Istithmar World portfolio and its Infinity investment - two segments that were ring fenced from the conglomerate's debt proposal agreed by a core group of bankers in May.
Any losses on the ring fenced activities would not be allowed to be offset against profits on the non-ring fenced activities.
At least 75% of gross assets would have to lie within the ring fenced business which implies a limit on development on 25% of assets.
The ring fencing recommendation is based on a combination of the UK Vickers Commission's suggestion that the banks' retail activities should be ring fenced, and the Volcker's rule to limit proprietary trading.
A PLEA for ring fenced cash to breathe new life into the struggling seaside towns of North Wales has been rejected by a government minister.
Volcker, who created the now famous Volcker rule, has said that taxpayers would not be protected in the event of another financial crisis if banks were ring fenced.