rinderpest


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rinderpest

(rĭn′dər-pĕst′)
n.
An acute, often fatal, contagious viral disease, chiefly of cattle, characterized by ulceration of the alimentary tract and resulting in diarrhea.

rinderpest

a highly contagious disease of ruminants caused by paramyxovirus (genus Morbillivirus). It is characterized by high fever, focal erosive lesions in the mouth and throughout the alimentary tract, by severe diarrhea and a high fatality rate. Called also cattle plague. See also peste des petits ruminants, jembrana disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
The overall effect of the rinderpest plague, compounded by initial depopulation and the subsequent migration of people away from the bite of the tsetse fly, was to shift the ecological balance of the trypanosome [sleeping sickness] cycle heavily in favour of wild-animal populations.
Rinderpest also called cattle plaque, did not affect humans but left millions of dead animals in its wake, causing major economic and social disruption.
The measles virus probably descended from the ancestors of the modern canine distemper and/or rinderpest viruses, a process which may be dated back to the Epipalaeolithic Age (approximately 10 000 BC), when man started domesticating dogs and cattle in the Middle East.
Increased contact with wildlife and associated diseases, combined with international trade in livestock, has led to outbreaks of diseases such as rinderpest [a viral disease affecting ungulates] in Africa and foot-and-mouth disease in Europe," stated the report.
To this end, I outline lethal epidemics in Zulu- and Xhosa-speaking societies that profoundly affected attitudes toward the renewal and conclusion of life-affirming practices: the 1890s rinderpest cattle epizootic, Spanish Influenza of 1918, and the AIDS catastrophe.
The Rinderpest scourge in 1897, which destroyed probably half, left, notwithstanding export and slaughter, something like 90,000 head.
Moose are affected in certain parts of the world by a variety of infectious agents, such as anthrax, rinderpest, necrobacillosis, and foot and mouth disease, which is contracted by coming into contact with reindeer.
In fact, Horn recently told a group of terrorism experts that world livestock is vulnerable to a host of debilitating ailments, including rinderpest, lumpy skin disease, bluetongue virus, and African horse-sickness.
In a strongly egalitarian society, a charismatic war leader and prophet was able to mobilize the community in the construction of a great mound to bury all the bad things associated with smallpox and rinderpest (Whittle 1997a: 148-9; Evans-Pritchard 1956; Johnson 1994).
When a public system of livestock disease control was eventually established in Britain, in the aftermath of the devastating rinderpest epidemic from 1865 to 1867, this followed the model already established in much of Western Europe.
Effective 1 January 1927, the directive banned the importation of fresh or frozen meat from "any region" in which either Foot-and-Mouth Disease or Rinderpest existed.