rigor


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rigor

 [rig´or, ri´gor]
1. a chill; rigidity.
2. strict discipline or scrupulous adherence to a given set of standards.
rigor mor´tis the stiffening of a dead body accompanying depletion of adenosine triphosphate in the muscle fibers.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē),
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
See also: nuchal rigidity. Synonym(s): rigor (1)
2. In psychiatry and clinical psychology, an aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
3. In neurology, one type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and lead-pipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]

rigor

/rig·or/ (rig´er) [L.] chill; rigidity.
rigor mor´tis  the stiffening of a dead body accompanying depletion of adenosine triphosphate in the muscle fibers.

rigor

(rĭg′ər)
n.
1.
a. Strictness or severity, as in action or judgment: "The desert fostered a closed world of faith and rigor and harsh judgment: almost every decision here could have lethal consequences" (Jeffrey Tayler).
b. A harsh or trying circumstance; a hardship or difficulty: the rigors of working in a coal mine.
c. Archaic A harsh or severe act.
2.
a. Strictness in adhering to standards or a method; exactitude: "To study the brain with scientific rigor, behaviorists logically restricted their experiments to ones in which the brain was the source of measurable effects" (Robert Pollack).
b. A standard or exacting requirement, as of a field of study: the intellectual rigors of advanced mathematics.
3. Medicine Shivering or trembling, as caused by a chill.
4. Physiology A state of rigidity in living tissues or organs that prevents response to stimuli.
5. Obsolete Stiffness or rigidity.

rigor

[rig′ər]
Etymology: L, stiffness
1 a rigid condition of the body tissues, as in rigor mortis.
2 a violent attack of shivering that may be associated with chills and fever.
Stiffness of a cadaver. The following are crude approximations of the time of death, based on temperature and presence/absence of rigor
warm and flaccid < 3 hours
warm and stiff 3-8 hours
cold and stiff 8-36 hours
cold and flaccid > 36 hours

chill

(chil)
1. A sensation of cold.
2. A feeling of cold with shivering and pallor, accompanied by an elevation of temperature in the interior of the body; usually a prodromal symptom of an infectious disease due to the presence in the blood of foreign protein or toxins.
Synonym(s): rigor (2) .
[A.S. cele, cold]

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē)
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
Synonym(s): rigor (1) .
2. psychiatry, clinical psychology An aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
3. neurology One type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and leadpipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]

rigor

A violent attack of shivering causing a rapid rise in body temperature.

rigor

a subjective sensation of feeling cold, accompanied by muscle tremor, characteristic of the increment stage of fever. Because of its subjectivity it is not a term that can be used in animal medicine.

rigor complexes
formed when actin and myosin bond together strongly in the absence of ATP; occurs in rigor mortis.
rigor mortis
the stiffening of a dead body accompanying depletion of adenosine triphosphate in the muscle fibers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The starkness of these brief sections of "onstage" narrative violence, or perceptual rigor mortis, enable readers to perceive the contrast between these sections and the "offstage," repressed, and fragmented memories they encounter throughout the rest of Beloved.
When asked if they would develop a cyber weapon in the interest of national security, Rigor said they might accept the job as long as it conforms to the founding principles of Pandora Security Labs.
Houser criticizes the report's assessment of rigor, noting that it was based only on a review of syllabi, which don't always show the depth of the work.
They found substantial evidence that indicated higher cognitive rigor was associated with greater academic achievement.
Fundada en 2009, la revista tiene una periodicidad semestral (se publica en junio y diciembre) con alcance nacional e internacional, tiene circulacion online de libre acceso, bajo estandares de rigor cientifico y de calidad editorial".
To assess rigor in experiential education, we must first define each of these terms.
Scaccia was performing at the Rail Club in Fort Worth, Texas, for Rigor Mortis lead singer Bruce Corbitt's 50th birthday when he collapsed.
Blackburn, a former teacher and principal who works as an educational consultant, speaker, and workshop presenter, shows teachers, principals, curriculum specialists, and professional development coordinators how to increase the level of rigor in classrooms by creating an environment in which each student is expected to learn at high levels, is supported to do so, and demonstrates learning at high levels, arguing that the power to make a difference lies in the hands of the teacher.
The trials had different degrees of rigor (low, medium, or high) and three different types of disclosures (drug-company funding, funding by the National Institutes of Health, or no disclosed funding).
Traditionally, researchers, policymakers, and practitioners have perceived a tension between rigor and accessibility in quantitative research and evaluation in postsecondary education.
Os efeitos das mudancas no estado de pre-rigor (tempo, temperatura e pH) e nas caracteristicas da carne (comprimento de sarcomero e nivel de maciez) sao diretamente influenciados pelas condicoes que prevalecem durante o periodo entre o abate e o completo desenvolvimento do estado de rigor mortis (TABOGA et al.