rigid

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rigid

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rigid

(rĭ′jĭd) [L. rigidus]
Stiff, hard, unyielding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Equally, rigidness within profession specific frameworks, education and/or career frameworks inhibits workforce flexibility leading to policy recommendations for the need to 'Unlock' skills within hospitals (15).
In order to evade an easy adaptation of the Constitution to the current interests of the ruling political force, the constitution-making power aims at a certain rigidness of the Constitution.
As there is less actual air inside the tyre, the key benefit of the new tyre is its stiffer sidewall that helps maintain the structural rigidness as-well-as helps in maintaining a constant pressure.
Its physico-chemical features in addition to mechanical properties are similar to those of polypropylene (PP) and polylactic-co-glycolic acids (PLGA) but inferior in its rigidness [1,4] The major function of PHB in microorganisms is to serve as an intracellular energy and carbon storage product in much the same mode as glycogen in mammalian tissue.
285) But legal doctrine is often hydraulic in nature; whenever the rigidness in one doctrinal area exerts pressure on courts' decisionmaking, that pressure often seeks release in other areas of the doctrine.
The current state of affairs thus does not indicate a shortage of capacities, but Slovenian eldercare facilities are facing increasingly more problems resulting from policy rigidness and a complete failure to implement any kind of measures.
The one-child policy in China has gone through three phases as regards the rigidness of its implementation.
Burgess having already completed his football eligibility, and having paid some $42,000 in tuition, the college can perhaps afford to stand on the rigidness of its rules.
The guidelines in this sense are strict, but this rigidness ends when it comes to what kinds of businesses are acceptable.
Gender role conflict is defined as a psychological state in which socialized gender roles have negative consequences on others and the self and occurs when restrictive and sexist gender roles result in personal rigidness, devaluation, or even violation of the self or others (O'Neil, Helms, Gable, David, & Wrightsman, 1986).
However, it should be noted that, as Minuchin (1988) argued, the term dysfunctionality should be reserved to families that, facing a time of crisis and/or change, increase their rigidness and resist the exploration of alternatives, while being constricted to extremes.
However, the rigidness of the system means that housing agency Whitefriars will only accommodate the family in a three-bedroom ground-floor property with no internal stairs.