right

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right

 [rīt]
something that is due to someone by law or by tradition.
right to fair treatment the fair selection and treatment of subjects during the course of a research study. Principles governing fairness include informed voluntary decision by the subjects to participate and selection according to criteria directly related to the study rather than according to artificial social or cultural biases.
negative right a right to refuse care or not to be interfered with; it obligates another to refrain from doing something. One example is the right to refuse treatment, which is grounded in the principle of respect for autonomy. This is mentioned in the “Patient's Bill of Rights;” see patient's rights.
patient's r's see patient's rights.
positive right a right to be provided with a good or service such as health care, usually grounded in the principle of justice. It is philosophically more difficult to justify than a negative right because it obligates another to do something.

congenital heart disease

A congenital malformation–eg, coarctation of aorta, VSD, ASD, tetraology of Fallot–of the heart or great blood vessels, which may or may not have clinical consequences. See Baby Faye heart, Shunt.
Congenital heart disease
Rightleft shunt Cyanotic shunt Tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great vessels, trucus arteriosus, tricuspid valve atresia
Leftright shunt Acyanotic shunt Patent ductus arteriosus, atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis, aortic coarctation (NEJM 2000; 342:256rv)

right

(rit) [AS. riht],

R; rt

1. Pert. to the dextral side of the body (the side away from the heart), which in most persons is the stronger or preferred. Synonym: dexter
2. Legal authority to supervise and control one's own actions or the actions of others.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jackson, for example, appears to be committed to a version of prospectivism according to which rightness depends on actual beliefs, reasonable probability estimates and the true account of value.
Supreme Court's opinion, see Lund, Unbearable Rightness, supra note
Fairchild does not ignore the danger, but like Huijskens doesn't second-guess the rightness she feels.
We have, for example, in recent years persuaded those at the top of the Conservative Party of the rightness of our grievances and our reform programme for solving the problem.
Flunder, a United Church of Christ pastor, scholar and theologian, argues well that the church cannot afford to obsess about the moral and ethical rightness of sexual orientation, while ignoring the wrongness of excluding our brothers and sisters.
Alan Scot Willis presents an honest, balanced, and forthright account of how the Southern Baptist hierarchy tried to persuade their congregations and pastors of the rightness and biblical correctness of an integrated society.
The problem comes when the breakup is accompanied by conflicts over territory and resources - conflicts which are often rooted in a web of historical claims which leaves each group deeply convinced of the rightness of its position.
We need to become confident in the rightness of our ideas, firm in our resolve, creative and determined in our social action, and unabashedly subversive of entrenched power whenever it works against our values (including those values we share with our religious friends).
It has the same BMW feeling of quality and rightness about it: the sort of involvement and feedback that makes you want to drive it and take pleasure even from short journeys to the shops.
Many of us feel it's our duty to champion rightness even when it comes to unimportant issues or facts.
It is formal, highly structured, and complex; however, it has a simplicity to it, a sense of rightness and inevitability that makes the work just seem to flow.
For them, the discovery of mass graves, the opening of the torture chambers, the discovery that Saddam sent his son to clean out the Central Bank in March are more than enough to convince them of the moral rightness of toppling the dictator.