right-handedness


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Related to right-handedness: dominant hand, Left handedness

right-handedness

a natural tendency to favor the use of the right hand. Also called dextrality. See also cerebral dominance, handedness.

right-handedness

The condition of greater adeptness in using the right hand. This characteristic is found in about 93% of the population. Synonym: dextrality
See: left-handedness
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is the conventional wisdom to use right-hand for activities and left-hand use is not acceptable in our society as well as in other societies as one participant stated that, "I have done my inter-graduate from France and it was a bit surprising for me, there was also a culture of enforcing right-handedness like people do here.
Based on this work published in the journal Plos One through an innovative approach using a large psychometric and brain imaging database, researchers in the Groupe d'Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle (CNRS/CEA/Universite de Bordeaux) have demonstrated that the location of language areas in the brain is independent of left- or right-handedness, except for a very small proportion of left-handed individuals whose right hemisphere is dominant for both manual work and language.
The development of handedness derives from a mixture of genes, environment, and cultural pressure to conform to right-handedness.
Right-handedness reaches back a half million years in the human evolutionary family, at least if scratched-up fossil teeth have anything to say about it.
Rife defined any parent or offspring who did not endorse strict right-handedness for all items as 'left handed'.
Dye's right-handedness fits better on our club and Tuck's left-handedness fits better on their club.
To make the molecule more difficult for cancer cells to fight, the MD Anderson team built a right-handed, "counterclockwise" version of the molecule called D-KLAKLAK-2, with the "D" denoting right-handedness.
Frustrated lefties of the world may wonder: how did right-handedness become so common?
By at least 120,000 years ago, right-handedness frequently occurred among Neandertals, Uomini asserts.
She says that the findings of her team's study attain significance because determining when right-handedness first evolved may shed light on traits linked to lateralised brains, such as language and technology.
Now, a new investigation by Frayer and an international team led by Virginie Volpato of the Senckenberg Institute in Frankfurt, Germany, has confirmed Regourdou's right-handedness by looking more closely at the robustness of the arms and shoulders, and comparing it with scratches on his teeth.
One in eight people in the UK is left-handed and this is thought to be due to a gene which comes in two forms - the left or "C" version, and the more common version responsible for right-handedness.