right to refuse treatment


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The doctrine that a person, even if involuntarily committed to a hospital, cannot be forced to submit to any treatment against his will unless a life-and-death emergency exists

right to refuse treatment

Forensic medicine A doctrine that a person, even if involuntarily committed to a hospital, may not be forced to submit to any treatment against his will unless a life-and-death emergency exists
References in periodicals archive ?
We will consider whether the right to refuse treatment is an absolute right, and very briefly reflect on the application of the constitutional limitations clause to this right.
Rivers, but noted that the right to refuse treatment is not absolute and
137 (1977) (discussing inability of patients to exercise right to bodily decision making due to incomplete informed consent doctrine); Robert Plotkin, limiting the Therapeutic Orgy: Mental Patients' Right to Refuse Treatment, 72 Nw.
75) In this regard, the Court of Appeal concluded that, under the particular terms of the Health Care Consent Act, 1996, incompetent patients do not have an absolute right to refuse treatment based on their own views concerning the nature of their mental health.
The right to refuse treatment is already included in the Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers' Rights.
While a case can be made that a right to refuse treatment isn't worth much if there is no right to treatment, one must ask is there a right "to treatment that can in no way benefit the one?
Earlier the NSSF said it would take legal action against private hospitals, adding that they had no right to refuse treatment to patients.
In a perfect world, the modern emphasis on patients' autonomy and right to refuse treatment would.
The cases are grouped in sections on ethical issues in nursing, such as the just allocation of health resources, confidentiality, and the sanctity of human life, and special problem areas in nursing practice such as abortion and contraception, genetic engineering, psychiatry and the control of human behavior, experimentation on human beings, and the right to refuse treatment.
As hard as it may be for a healthcare professional to accept, it is the patient's right to refuse treatment for cancer, whether it be for religious reasons or other beliefs.
11) Also, it has long been established that patients have an ethical and legal right to refuse treatment, but they have neither the ethical nor the legal right to demand treatment.