ribbon


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rib·bon

(rib'ŏn),
A ribbon-shaped structure.
[M. E. riban]
Histology A series of consecutive slices of tissue held together by a thin layer of paraffin
Popular health A strip of flat cloth, usually satin, with a single loop; the use of ribbons to signify awareness or support of a disease or cause began with the red ribbon, signifying AIDS awareness, and has continued with myriad other colours and causes.

ribbon

Vox populi A strip of satin in a single loop; ribbonmania began with the red ribbon, signifying AIDS awareness; it has continued ad absurdum with its wearers lending their maudlin support to virtually every disease, cause, and hackneyed do-gooder catchphrase in every known color

rib·bon

(rib'ŏn)
A ribbon-shaped structure.
[M. E. riban]
References in classic literature ?
The ribbon was pulled out of Topsy's own sleeve, yet was she not in the least disconcerted; she only looked at it with an air of the most surprised and unconscious innocence.
I hear you have a charming collection of new ribbons from town.
Her headlong course down the house stairs; the brisk activity of all her movements; the incessant sparkle of expression in her face; the enticing gayety which took the hearts of the quietest people by storm -- even the reckless delight in bright colors which showed itself in her brilliantly-striped morning dress, in her fluttering ribbons, in the large scarlet rosettes on her smart little shoes -- all sprang alike from the same source; from the overflowing physical health which strengthened every muscle, braced every nerve, and set the warm young blood tingling through her veins, like the blood of a growing child.
Strong, dressed in white, with cherry-coloured ribbons, was playing the piano, when we went in; and he was leaning over her to turn the leaves.
And the birch rustled its leaves, and said: 'I have served you longer than I can say, and you never tied a bit of twine even round my branches; and the dear children bound them up with their brightest ribbons.
cried out several voices, deceived by the blue ribbon and chestnut horse of Winter; "take him alive.
That had never happened yet; and now her imagination, instead of retracing the past, was busy fashioning what would happen to- morrow--whereabout in the Chase she should see him coming towards her, how she should put her new rose-coloured ribbon on, which he had never seen, and what he would say to her to make her return his glance--a glance which she would be living through in her memory, over and over again, all the rest of the day.
Only, in the chapter of charges, Mademoiselle de Montalais cost per annum: -- ribbons, gloves, and sweets, a thousand livres.
Her shoes -- of pink leather -- are fastened each with a bunch of yellow ribbons puckered up in the shape of a cabbage.
On the threshold he paused to look at her; then he stole back, lifted one of the ends of velvet ribbon, kissed it, and left the room without her hearing him or changing her attitude.
And she spread out her arms to show her short-waisted, lace-trimmed, dainty gray dress, girdled with a broad ribbon just below the breast.
Well, she followed the ribbon to a place where it became a bridge over a dry puddle into which another fairy had fallen and been unable to climb out.