rhyme

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Related to rhymed: rhymer, Nursery rhymes

rhyme

(rīm)
1. Correspondence in sound of the ends of words, e.g., smell, well, and foretell.
2. A poem in rhyme.
rhyme
References in periodicals archive ?
Although there can be historical or conventional connections between a given poetic device and a given attitude--like the prevalent attitude today toward rhyme--I doubt there can be any innate connection, since every conceivable attitude has been expressed by poets in one place or another in every conceivable poetic mode, from the most conventionally rhymed sonnet that was nevertheless avant-garde in its poetic thinking, in how it made meaning, to the freest free verse that is scarcely more than one individual poet's repetition of cliches both linguistic and existential.
Between Western and Eastern Han there was a notable shift involving words in the Qieyun geng [Chinese Text Omitted] rhyme, such as ming [Chinese Text Omitted] and jing [Chinese Text Omitted], which had formerly belonged to the Shijing yang [Chinese Text Omitted] rhyme in *-an but now rhymed in the geng [Chinese Text Omitted] category.
Perle, occurring 51 times, singular and plural, pay 11 times, in the sense both of pleasing and payment, precious 12 times, paradys three times, parfyt four times, pes four times, pyght 13 times, place five times, plyt four times, pray/prayer five times, prynce five times, prys four times, and pur four times, are prominent in refrains and stressed, alliterating, and rhymed positions (Kottler and Markman 429-47).
Less than a century after Sidney's Apology, the impressive tradition of Latin and Romance verse from which English rhymed poetry arose had become the lame meter of a barbarous age.
Maguire finds the most complete psychological and generic integrations in the rhymed heroic plays of Orrery and Dryden.
But to connect Campion's Observations with his rhymed English verse requires the mediation of the concept "humanism," which does not adhere to his poetry as easily as to his tract.
Using the presence of a smattering of rhymed couplets as a point of departure, I will consider variations along two different axes, one of sound and one of space.