rhombencephalitis

rhombencephalitis

Brainstem encephalitis Neurology An infection of the brain corresponding to the rhombencephalon Grade I–generalized myoclinic jerks with tremor and/or ataxia Grade II–myoclonus with cranial nerve involvement–eg, ocular disturbance–nystagus, strabismus, or gaze paresis or bulbar palsy Grade III–transient myoclonus followed by rapid onset of respiratory distress, cyanosis, poor peripheral perfusion, shock, coma, loss of doll's eye reflex, and apnea

rhombencephalitis

, rhomboencephalitis (rŏmb′ĕn-sĕf-ă-lī′tĭs) (rŏm′bō-ĕn-sĕf-ă-lī′tĭs)
Brainstem infection, a disease that is most often caused by the bacterium Listeria moncytogenes or by West Nile virus, Nipah viruses, or enteroviruses. The infection is often characterized by symptoms such as fever, malaise, headache, nausea, vomiting, altered mental status, ataxia, and strokelike impairment of cranial nerves.
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Eighth nerve herpetic neuritis and contra lateral rhombencephalitis and mesencephalitis on contrast enhanced MR imaging.
The distribution of E-cadherin expression in listeric rhombencephalitis of ruminants indicates its involvement in Listeria monocytogenes neuroinvasion.
Rhombencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes with striking involvement of trigeminal nerve on MR imaging.
Rhombencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in humans and ruminants: a zoonosis on the rise?
1) A distinctive form of rhombencephalitis also exists, manifesting as asymmetric cranial nerve palsies, hemiparesis, and coma.
Recent examples are the emergence of enterovirus A71 (EV-A71), which was responsible for large hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) outbreaks associated with rare but severe rhombencephalitis in Asia, and an EV-D68 epidemic associated with severe respiratory infections (1,2).
In France, during 2000-2009, a total of 81 hospitalized patients with EV-17 infection were reported by the sentinel surveillance system, including 2 child deaths, 1 due to proven rhombencephalitis (3,4).
This report describes a fatal case of acute pulmonary edema with rhombencephalitis that occurred within the course of an EV71 infection in France.
Signs and symptoms of rhombencephalitis are irritability, myoclonus, ataxia, and cranial nerve involvement (1).
In children, the CNS complications associated with EV71 manifest clinically in various ways, such as aseptic meningitis, acute flaccid paralysis, and rhombencephalitis; rhombencephalitis is one of the most common severe neurologic symptoms (2).