rhizome

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rhi·zome

(rī'zōm),
The creeping underground stem of some plants (for example, iris, calamus, and sanguinaria).
[G. rhizōma, mass of roots, fr. rhiza, root, + -oma, mass]

rhizome

an underground plant stem, growing more or less horizontally, that usually has roots on its underside and bears buds.

rhizome

a horizontal underground stem (with leaves and buds) that serves as a storage organ and a means of VEGETATIVE PROPAGATION. Rhizomes are found in flowering plants such as Iris.

rhizome (rīˑ·zōm),

n root system of some perennial plants; consists of roots that grow horizontally; may also bear scales and nodes.

rhizome

an underground plant stem that develops roots and leaves at nodes along its length, e.g. in bracken, Sorghum halepense.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hickey-Moody (2008), working with dancers with learning disabilities in Australia (where learning disability has a more generic application than in the US), has deployed the rhizome to reposition the body as becoming through movement--where they are in a state of continuous evolution--whereas Goodley and Moore (2002) have explored the potential of the rhizomic qualities of the arts and the absence of constraints associated with language to open up possibilities for individuals with learning disabilities.
Further, Granger's (2010) reframing of her learning disabled self as transgressive and disruptive was arrived at through a recognition, although not articulated as such, that her learning was rhizomic.
This argument is also made by Olsson (2009) in her research with very young children, and her work illustrates the positive effects of viewing learning as rhizomic, which could be of great use in learning disability contexts.
Deleuze and Parnett (1987) emphasize the importance of rhizomic analysis doing something other than seeking to capture or pin down phenomena, since "movement always happens behind the thinker's back or in the movement when he blinks" (p.
As suggested, several researchers have taken up the concept of the rhizome to help explore and explain learning disability, and disability more generally, but to date, there are fewer instances of researchers undertaking rhizomic analyses.
Mercieca's rhizomic analysis took him to a series of planes of sense-making--space, body, sound, and time--which allowed him to see students with disabilities as altering and affecting the educational terrain in profound ways and provided, for Mercieca, ultimately "a violent experience" (p.
Sections eight and nine explore alternative radical-democratic roads into hypermodern rhizomic ambivalence.
The following short story on Belgium's desperate politics and economics aims to sketch an aspect of our hypermodern zone, wherein not only capital - whichever "capital" one would want to imagine - simultaneously fully reproduces itself through rhizomic global dis/connections and borderless lines of flight and subject(ivitie)s.
Cultural Dimensions of Hypermodernity (I): Rhizomic Flexibilities and Reflexivities
Hypermodern capital is now flowing in and through bewildering, rhizomic networks of often nonlinear, time/space border-crossing causal chains.
Hypermodern reflexivity, with its rhizomic, border-crossing subjectifications, has driven "progressives" into ambivalent and paradoxical rhizomics.
Are these words on a radical-democratic politics, which shows itself to be sensitive to hypermodern rhizomic ambivalence and paradox, themselves not bound to get stuck in ambivalent and paradoxical rhizomics?