rhizoid


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rhizoid

 [ri´zoid]
resembling a root.

rhi·zoid

(rī'zoyd),
1. Rootlike.
2. Irregularly branching, like a root; denoting a form of bacterial growth.
3. mycology the rootlike hyphae of fungi that arise at the nodes of the hyphae of Rhizopus species.
[rhizo- + G. eidos, resemblance]

rhizoid

/rhi·zoid/ (ri´zoid)
1. resembling a root.
2. a filamentous structure of fungi and some algae that extends into the substrate.

rhizoid

(rī′zoid′)
n.
A slender rootlike filament that grows from an alga, a fungus, or the gametophyte of a moss, liverwort, or fern, used for attachment and nourishment.

rhi′zoid′, rhi·zoi′dal (-zoid′l) adj.

rhizoid

[rī′zoid]
resembling a root or serving to anchor.

rhi·zoid

(rī'zoyd)
1. Rootlike.
2. Irregularly branching, like a root; denoting a form of bacterial growth.
3. In fungi, the rootlike hyphae that arise at the nodes of the hyphae of Rhizopus species.
[rhizo- + G. eidos, resemblance]

rhizoid

a hairlike structure that functions as a root in lower organisms such as certain fungi and mosses. Rhizoids are important in penetrating a substance, giving anchorage and absorbing nutrients.

rhizoid

resembling a root; said of hyphae produced by fungi which infiltrate the substrate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prothalli of Cyrtogonellum fraxinellum had elongate-spatulate shape with irregularly branched wings, a dense cover of rhizoids, and usually one (Fig.
Photoregulation of asymmetric cell division followed by rhizoid development in the fern Ceratopteris prothalli.
Rhizoids were formed by the cell divisions of the prothallial cells.
The spores studied here exhibit Cyathea-type spore germination, in which the filament grows along the polar axis and the first rhizoid appears from the equatorial plane.
vittata Trilete, tetrahedral, Vittaria-type, day brown and possess a 2-3, a rhizoid first distinct equatorial develops and the flange, (90) 95 (100) first prothallial cell X (80) 87.
Growing rapidly, the candida yeast may change into a fungal form, becoming invasive and developing rhizoids, which burrow into the intestinal wall.
The species was described as having non-lacerated blades attached by rhizoids, only 1.
Rhizoids are found in tufts, smooth walled, long and brown in colour.
He conceived the sporophyte of the most primitive land plant as a dichotomously branched system of cylindrical cauloids, which bore leaf-like appendages, or phylloids, together with rhizoids.