rhizobium

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Related to rhizobia: Bacteroids, Leghaemoglobin

rhizobium

(rī-zō′bē-əm)
n. pl. rhizo·bia (-bē-ə)
Any of various aerobic bacteria of the genus Rhizobium that form root nodules in leguminous plants, such as clover and beans, where they establish a symbiotic relationship in which the bacteria obtain carbon and energy from the plant while supplying the plant with nitrogen by nitrogen fixation.
References in periodicals archive ?
meliloti in soils of the Rhayet and Enfidha regions, which were used in this study to recover rhizobia with M.
For example, when the researchers compared growth and survival of silver wattle (Acacia dealbata) seedlings in the presence of elite, as opposed to ineffective (virtually parasitic) strains of native rhizobia in glasshouse experiments, the differences were dramatic.
It is interesting to note that hadulin expression which resulted in root hair deformation and curling could be induced by flavonoid-pretreated rhizobia regardless of the host symbiont relationship; root hair changes, therefore, are dependent on initial Nod factor induction of hadulins rather than later chemical signalling from the root (Scheres et al.
In contrast, rhizobia deliver nitrogen directly to the plant, Hardy says.
They can supply 103-104 different species of Rhizobium per hectare, thus overcoming the negative effects of suboptimal placement of rhizobia or mismatches with non-hosts (Stephens and Rask, 2000; Catroux et al.
Although rhizobia are recommended for biological N fixation in nodule-forming Fabaceae species, they can act as growth promoters in other plant species, including Poaceae, such as maize.
Rhizobia inoculation improves nutrient uptake and growth of lowland rice.
The genomes of fast-growing rhizobia usually consist of circular chromosome and one or more large plasmids containing genes required for establishing symbiosis.
2014) used Cratylia argentea for recovery of degraded areas in the cerrado, and only one individual in the field was associated with native rhizobia.
Despite the importance of this crop, few studies have been performed for the selection of new rhizobia strains that are efficient at nitrogen fixation in symbiosis with cowpea at Maranhao, and this practice is little used in this State, especially in family-based agriculture systems.
The route that rhizobia fixes nitrogen is brief: rhizobia initiates the infection at the axils of emerging lateral roots and proliferates in intercellular spaces before entering in cortical cells.