rheotaxis


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rheotaxis

 [re″o-tak´sis]
orientation of an organism in a stream of liquid, with its long axis parallel with the direction of flow, designated negative (moving in the same direction) or positive (moving in the opposite direction).

rhe·o·tax·is

(rē'ō-tak'sis),
A form of positive barotaxis, in which a microorganism in a fluid is impelled to move against the current flow of its medium.
[rheo- + G. taxis, orderly arrangement]

rheotaxis

/rheo·tax·is/ (re″o-tak´sis) the orientation of an organism in a stream of liquid, with its long axis parallel with the direction of flow, designated negative (moving in the same direction) or positive (moving in the opposite direction).

rheotaxis

(rē′ə-tăk′sĭs)
n.
Movement of an organism in response to a current of water.

rhe′o·tac′tic (-tăk′tĭk) adj.

rhe·o·tax·is

(rē'ō-tak'sis)
A form of positive barotaxis in which a microorganism in a fluid is impelled to move against the current flow of its medium.
[rheo- + G. taxis, orderly arrangement]

rheotaxis

a movement (taxis) in response to a current, usually of water.

rheotaxis

orientation of an organism in a stream of liquid, with its long axis parallel with the direction of flow, designated negative (moving in the same direction) or positive (moving in the opposite direction).
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sharks need the lateral line to locate odor sources, rheotaxis and eddy chemotaxis.
Some taxa used positive rheotaxis so long as sufficient water current was available.
The widespread use of rheotaxis in conjunction with olfaction may reflect the stability of flow cues when compared to the chemical cues used in chemotaxis.
Given that wind and water currents act as both a dispersal mechanism for odors and direct stimulus for rheotaxis, a countervailing relationship exists between current speed and the concentration of odorant molecules detected at the receiver's chemosensors.
Water-flow sensitive pedal neurons in Tritonia: role in rheotaxis.
Positive rheotaxis can reach a stationary upstream target only if flow heading changes little over the course of the behavior.
All these observations point to an orientation relative to flow that is based on context, rather than simply on constant positive rheotaxis.
1972), to which sea stars show a positive rheotaxis (Valentincic, 1983).
The orientation behavior that results from multiple inputs of chemosensory and mechanosensory information could be due to a range of orientation strategies from a chemically triggered rheotaxis to a flow-triggered chemotaxis (for a review of different orientation strategies, see Shone, 1984).
This is different from pure rheotaxis in that the path includes movements along filaments that are sometimes oblique or orthogonal to the direction of mean flow.
Subsequent analyses of three representative paths demonstrating rheotaxis, casting, and filament tracking were digitized at 30 Hz.
Our results demonstrate an odor-conditioned rheotaxis that orients crabs upstream.