rheotaxis

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rheotaxis

 [re″o-tak´sis]
orientation of an organism in a stream of liquid, with its long axis parallel with the direction of flow, designated negative (moving in the same direction) or positive (moving in the opposite direction).

rhe·o·tax·is

(rē'ō-tak'sis),
A form of positive barotaxis, in which a microorganism in a fluid is impelled to move against the current flow of its medium.
[rheo- + G. taxis, orderly arrangement]

rheotaxis

/rheo·tax·is/ (re″o-tak´sis) the orientation of an organism in a stream of liquid, with its long axis parallel with the direction of flow, designated negative (moving in the same direction) or positive (moving in the opposite direction).

rheotaxis

(rē′ə-tăk′sĭs)
n.
Movement of an organism in response to a current of water.

rhe′o·tac′tic (-tăk′tĭk) adj.

rhe·o·tax·is

(rē'ō-tak'sis)
A form of positive barotaxis in which a microorganism in a fluid is impelled to move against the current flow of its medium.
[rheo- + G. taxis, orderly arrangement]

rheotaxis

a movement (taxis) in response to a current, usually of water.

rheotaxis

orientation of an organism in a stream of liquid, with its long axis parallel with the direction of flow, designated negative (moving in the same direction) or positive (moving in the opposite direction).
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References in periodicals archive ?
leg probing and grasping) more often at slack tide when strong rheotactic cues were not available.
Sharks are also able to locate sources of odor, perhaps by using a combination of rheotactic (an oriented response with respect to the direction of water flow) and chemotactic mechanisms (Hodgson and Mathewson, 1971).
In no-flow experiments, odor delivery is unpredictable, although these do eliminate concerns about rheotactic behavior - starfish have been variously reported to move upstream (3) or cross-stream (4) [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE I OMITTED] when in flow with no odor.
Either the eels are using chemical cues to override the rheotactic cues temporarily; or they are using chemical cues to indicate which local currents (which may be oblique, perpendicular, or counter to the mean flow) to follow.