rhabdomyolysis


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Related to rhabdomyolysis: exertional rhabdomyolysis

rhabdomyolysis

 [rab″do-mi-ol´ĭ-sis]
disintegration of striated muscle fibers with excretion of myoglobin in the urine. See also crush syndrome.

rhab·do·my·ol·y·sis

(rab'dō-mī-ol'i-sis), Avoid the mispronunciation rhabdomyoly'sis.
An acute, fulminating, potentially fatal disease of skeletal muscle that entails destruction of muscle, as evidenced by myoglobinemia and myoglobinuria.
[rhabdo- + G. mys, muscle, + lysis, loosening]

rhabdomyolysis

/rhab·do·my·ol·y·sis/ (-mi-ol´ĭ-sis) disintegration of striated muscle fibers with excretion of myoglobin in the urine.

rhabdomyolysis

[rab′dōmī·ol′isis]
a paroxysmal, potentially fatal syndrome caused by the breakdown of skeletal muscle fibers. It is characterized by the presence of myoglobin in the urine. It may result from untreated compartment syndrome. It is also associated with acute renal failure.

rhabdomyolysis

Skeletal muscle destruction, with release of myoglobin in blood and urine Etiology Severe exertion–eg, marathons, calisthenics, muscle necrosis due to arterial occlusion, DVT, seizures, drug overdose–amphetamines, cocaine, heroin, PCP, trauma, shaking chills, heatstroke, alcohol–delirium tremens. See Crush injury, Exertional rhabdomyolysis, Myoglobinuria.

rhab·do·my·ol·y·sis

(rab'dō-mī-ol'i-sis)
An acute, fulminating, potentially fatal disease of skeletal muscle that entails destruction of muscle as evidenced by myoglobinemia and myoglobinuria.
[rhabdo- + G. mys, muscle, + lysis, loosening]

rhabdomyolysis

Breakdown of muscle with release of MYOGLOBIN. This is usually the result of a severe crushing injury but may occur in severe and persistent exertion; dopaminergic blockade or withdrawal of dopaminic agents; low potassium, sodium or phosphate levels; the use of statin drugs; or following a virus infection of muscle. The condition causes weakness or temporary paralysis but full recovery is usual except in cases of severe injury. The condition may occur in MCARDLE'S DISEASE.

rhabdomyolysis

disintegration of striated muscle fibers with excretion of myoglobin in the urine.

equine rhabdomyolysis
see paralytic myoglobinuria.
exertional rhabdomyolysis
see exertional rhabdomyolysis.
transient exertional rhabdomyolysis
References in periodicals archive ?
Bariatric surgery: Rhabdomyolysis after open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: A prospective study.
3,4) Although repeated experimental animal investigations have demonstrated rhabdomyolysis with myoglobinuria after feedings with toxic seafood, the Haff disease toxin remains unidentified.
The concern is whether rhabdomyolysis is a reasonably foreseeable consequence of strenuous or prolonged exertion during exercise and sports events.
Rhabdomyolysis is an uncommon side effect of trabectedin which is used for the second line therapy of metastatic sarcoma after anthracycline and ifosfamide failure.
Rhabdomyolysis is relatively rare condition in which muscle tissue breaks down to such an extent that toxins released into the blood stream can damage the kidneys, the ABC News reported.
Compared with azithromycin, a prescription for either of the other antibiotics was associated with one extra death in every 399 older adults treated, one extra acute kidney injury in every 499 treated, and one extra hospitalisation for rhabdomyolysis in every 5 870 treated.
This article presents the case of a young golf player with rhabdomyolysis, as well as current theories on cellular mechanisms, and symptoms and treatment of acute corticosteroid-induced rhabdomyolysis.
Rhabdomyolysis may develop due to traumatic and non-traumatic causes, including crush injury, burns, vascular occlusion, overexertion during exercise, and drugs or other toxins (Lazenby, 2011).
Hypokalaemia is a widely known, though rare, cause of rhabdomyolysis (2).
Case reports have documented serious adverse consequences, including rhabdomyolysis (muscle injury) and death, from erythromycin-related or clarithromycin-related statin toxicity.
pneumoniae infection, and we discuss the possible pathomechanisms for rhabdomyolysis.