rhabdomyolysis


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Related to rhabdomyolysis: exertional rhabdomyolysis

rhabdomyolysis

 [rab″do-mi-ol´ĭ-sis]
disintegration of striated muscle fibers with excretion of myoglobin in the urine. See also crush syndrome.

rhab·do·my·ol·y·sis

(rab'dō-mī-ol'i-sis), Avoid the mispronunciation rhabdomyoly'sis.
An acute, fulminating, potentially fatal disease of skeletal muscle that entails destruction of muscle, as evidenced by myoglobinemia and myoglobinuria.
[rhabdo- + G. mys, muscle, + lysis, loosening]

rhabdomyolysis

/rhab·do·my·ol·y·sis/ (-mi-ol´ĭ-sis) disintegration of striated muscle fibers with excretion of myoglobin in the urine.

rhabdomyolysis

[rab′dōmī·ol′isis]
a paroxysmal, potentially fatal syndrome caused by the breakdown of skeletal muscle fibers. It is characterized by the presence of myoglobin in the urine. It may result from untreated compartment syndrome. It is also associated with acute renal failure.

rhabdomyolysis

Skeletal muscle destruction, with release of myoglobin in blood and urine Etiology Severe exertion–eg, marathons, calisthenics, muscle necrosis due to arterial occlusion, DVT, seizures, drug overdose–amphetamines, cocaine, heroin, PCP, trauma, shaking chills, heatstroke, alcohol–delirium tremens. See Crush injury, Exertional rhabdomyolysis, Myoglobinuria.

rhab·do·my·ol·y·sis

(rab'dō-mī-ol'i-sis)
An acute, fulminating, potentially fatal disease of skeletal muscle that entails destruction of muscle as evidenced by myoglobinemia and myoglobinuria.
[rhabdo- + G. mys, muscle, + lysis, loosening]

rhabdomyolysis

Breakdown of muscle with release of MYOGLOBIN. This is usually the result of a severe crushing injury but may occur in severe and persistent exertion; dopaminergic blockade or withdrawal of dopaminic agents; low potassium, sodium or phosphate levels; the use of statin drugs; or following a virus infection of muscle. The condition causes weakness or temporary paralysis but full recovery is usual except in cases of severe injury. The condition may occur in MCARDLE'S DISEASE.

rhabdomyolysis

disintegration of striated muscle fibers with excretion of myoglobin in the urine.

equine rhabdomyolysis
see paralytic myoglobinuria.
exertional rhabdomyolysis
see exertional rhabdomyolysis.
transient exertional rhabdomyolysis
References in periodicals archive ?
Intolerance was defined as an increase of CPK >3-10 times the upper limit normal (ULN), and/or a rise in transaminases values >3-5 times ULN, and/or the onset of asthenia, myalgia or rhabdomyolysis whilst on actual statin dosage.
Rhabdomyolysis (RML) can cause serious electrolyte imbalances such as hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hypocalcemia, as well as metabolic derangements such as hyperuricemia and metabolic acidosis.
When compared with azithromycin, coprescription with clarithromycin or erythromycin was associated with an overall higher risk for the primary outcome of hospitalization with rhabdomyolysis within 30 days of the prescription and for the secondary outcome of all-cause mortality.
Rhabdomyolysis is an uncommon side effect of trabectedin which is used for the second line therapy of metastatic sarcoma after anthracycline and ifosfamide failure.
Rhabdomyolysis is relatively rare condition in which muscle tissue breaks down to such an extent that toxins released into the blood stream can damage the kidneys, the ABC News reported.
Compared with azithromycin, a prescription for either of the other antibiotics was associated with one extra death in every 399 older adults treated, one extra acute kidney injury in every 499 treated, and one extra hospitalisation for rhabdomyolysis in every 5 870 treated.
A diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was made based on elevated serum creatine phosphokinase levels (7810 U/l) and myoglobinuria (210 [micro]g/l).
pneumoniae infection, and we discuss the possible pathomechanisms for rhabdomyolysis.
A diagnosis of cocaine-induced rhabdomyolysis with secondary acute renal failure was made.
Unlike marijuana, there is a wide spectrum of heroin-associated renal injuries, including injury secondary to rhabdomyolysis, glomerulonephropathies and interstitial nephritis (Sreepada Rao, Nicastri, & Friedman, 1977).
Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical and biochemical syndrome resulting from skeletal muscle injury and the release muscular cell constituents into extracellular fluid and the circulation (1).