rhabdom


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Related to rhabdom: Rhabdomere, ommatidium, apposition eye

rhabdom

(răb′dəm, -dŏm′)
n.
A rodlike structure in the center of each ommatidium in the compound eye of an arthropod, composed of microvilli extending from the surrounding retinular cells.

rhabdom

or

rhabdome

a transparent rod that passes down the centre of an insect or crustacean ommatidium. see EYE, COMPOUND.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Then, soon after sunrise, after the clock-driven efferent neurons stop firing (Chamberlain et ai, 1987), the concentration of Rh-LpOps1-4 drops precipitously during a burst of what is called transient rhabdom shedding.
These inclusions seem to be concentrated in the background of the eye and may represent a tapetum (corroborating Shear's observation 1993a, b) and thus correspond to the peculiar positioned proximal, open rhabdom of the retina (see above).
An additional synapomorphy for Leptopodomorpha is the shape of the rhabdom resembling a "5" pattern on a dice (Fischer et al.
corniculatus rhabdom appears to be homologous to, yet highly elaborated from, these small microvillar arrays.
saltator, like some other amphipods, possesses an undifferentiated cornea, a fused-type rhabdom attached to the crystalline cone, and five retinula cells in each ommatidium (Ball, 1977; Meyer-Rochow, 1978; Hallberg et al.
These types vary primarily in the construction of the rhabdom, so only this part of each ommatidium is diagrammed in Figure 3.
In most arthropod species that have superposition compound eyes, light reflected by the tapetum and not absorbed by the rhabdoms is visible as eyeshine (Kunze, 1979).
To do this, two additional pieces of information are required: rhabdom length and the specific absorbance (i.
The rhabdom layer extends backward beneath the dorsal carapace of the cephalothorax without interruption to form the thoracic eye [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3A OMITTED].
The volume density of the rhabdom was determined from high magnification light micrographs using point-counting stereology.