revivification

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Related to revivifications: revivified

re·viv·i·fi·ca·tion

(rē-viv'i-fi-kā'shŭn),
1. Renewal of life and strength. Synonym(s): revivescence
2. Refreshening the edges of a wound by paring or scraping to promote healing. Synonym(s): vivification
[L. re-, again, + vivo, to live, + facio, to make]

re·viv·i·fi·ca·tion

(rē-viv'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. Renewal of life and strength.
2. Refreshening the edges of a wound by paring or scraping to promote healing.
Synonym(s): vivification.
[L. re-, again, + vivo, to live, + facio, to make]

revivification

(rē-vĭv″ĭ-fĭ-kā′shŭn) [L. re, again, + vivere, to live, + facere, to make]
1. An attempt to restore life to those apparently dead; restoration to life or consciousness; also the restoration of life in local parts, as a limb after freezing.
2. The pairing of surfaces to facilitate healing, as in a wound.

re·viv·i·fi·ca·tion

(rē-viv'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
Refreshening edges of a wound by paring or scraping to promote healing.
[L. re-, again, + vivo, to live, + facio, to make]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Spontaneous revivification of the suffocated woman is possible upon the return of the womb to its proper place (or upon being treated for noxious fumes), but a physician must first recognize the deceitful appearance of morbidity before he may treat the underlying matter of uterine dysfunction.
It is with Pliny that the most famed and repeated revivification story seems to originate, though his story is adapted by subsequent generations of medical writers who frequently attribute Pliny's story to others.
Juliet's revivification scene thus takes on additional significance, for the Friar's potion has a singular effect, mimicking the symptoms of the moribund hysteric in syncope.
After Juliet has taken the potion and Capulet discovers her deathly state, again he misrecognizes Juliet's body language; however, here, instead of thinking she might be in a state of syncope, he believes her dead too quickly, especially given the dictates of popular lore regarding the ancient tests for life and the waiting period to be observed to allow for revivification, lest a woman be buried prematurely.