revive

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Related to revived: preliminarily, expedite, averted

revive

(rĭ-vīv′)
v. re·vived, re·viving, re·vives
v.tr.
To bring back to life or consciousness; resuscitate: revived the passenger who fainted.

re·viv′a·ble adj.
re·viv′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hospitals like Advocate Good Samaritan in Downers Grove are working on procedures to pair an addiction specialist with revived overdose patients in the emergency department, with a goal of linking patients to an outpatient clinic where they can start medication-assisted treatment.
MMA to be revived from October 18, minus JI: Maulana Fazlur Rehman
While projects that were earlier stalled or shelved often get revived, stalling may happen at any stage - soon after the project announcement but before any actual work is done or even after some considerable progress has been made.
Guests in the studio will include Gaz Coombes of Supergrass, who will discuss their memories of the time, and there will be archive recordings revived from the programme's heyday.
He said that Pakistan's film industry could not be revived unless and until it is declared as industry officially.
Paul NewmanAaes legendary gunslinger is set to be revived in a sequel to 1969 classicAaButch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid.
1 : to bring back or come back to life, consciousness, freshness, or activity <Doctors revived the patient.
Panke would make a great addition to any luxury marque, including a revived Aston Martin, while Folz has proven skills at turning around troubled businesses.
CANOGA PARK -- A man believed dead after a shooting over the weekend was revived at a local hospital, authorities said Tuesday.
They join several other companies recognizing Tetley's 80th year, including Stuttgart Ballet, where Voluntaries premiered in 1973, and the Norwegian National Ballet, which revived his full-length version of The Tempest at the beginning of the year.
While all sorts of issues might organize such a discussion, including reviving some earlier debates about the role of narrative and modes of presentation in the field or the question of appropriate periodization, four topics commanded greatest attention: the question of social history and choice of geographic units of study; the ongoing analysis of power and the relationship between social history and politics; revived concerns about social structure and inequality; and the relationship between social history and teaching/reaching wider publics.