revertant

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re·ver·tant

(rē-ver'tănt),
In microbial genetics, a mutant that has reverted to its former genotype (true reversion) or to the original phenotype by means of a suppressor mutation.
[L. revertans, pres.p. of reverto, to turn back]

revertant

(rĭ-vûr′tnt)
adj.
Having reverted to the normal phenotype, usually by a second mutation: a revertant mutant; revertant cells.
n.
A revertant organism, cell, or strain.

re·ver·tant

(rē-vĕr'tănt)
microbial genetics A mutant that has reverted to its former genotype (true reversion) or to the original phenotype by means of a suppressor mutation.
[L. reverto, to turn back]

revertant

see REVERSION.

Patient discussion about revertant

Q. Could it revert back to my mom? If yes, how to deal with it? my mom’s lump is removed, chemotherapy is just over and she is getting well. My mom is a tea and coffee lover. But with doctors advice she did cut down on tea/coffee say once in a week. Could it revert back to my mom? If yes, how to deal with it?

A. Tea and coffee do not have any impact on the breast cancer recurrence. Caffeine in the coffee needs to be monitored as it increases some symptoms for breast lumps which are not cancerous but can increase the risk for cancer. It doesn’t show any link in cancer recurrence. Tea has nothing to do with cancer recurrence rather it is being proved having green tea helps in reduction of the tumor. Your mom can have green tea, if she feels unsafe to have coffee or normal tea.

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References in periodicals archive ?
In mutagenicity test, although [beta]-asarone increased numbers of revertants statistically from the concentration of 50 [micro]g/plate, we considered the mutagenicity was observed at 200 [micro]g/plate.
A similar reduction in the number of his + revertants was observed with water, acetone, and chloroform extracts of Emblica officinalis Gaertn.
The plates were incubated for 48 h at 37[degrees]C and the number of revertants was counted.
revertants on selective plates divided by the total number of viable cells, which were determined by counting the number of colonies on the non-selective plates.
Plates were incubated for 3 days, the colonies were counted, and linear regressions were calculated over the linear portion of the dose-response curves to determine the mutagenic potencies expressed as revertants (rev) per microgram.
The plates were allowed to harden horizontally for about half an hour and were incubated at 37 [degrees]C for 48 hours and the number of induced revertants was scored.
Mutagenicity, measured as the number of net revertants (rev) per liter, was determined by the plate incorporation method of Maron and Ames (1983).
The extract did not increase the numbers of revertants and showed no signs of mutagenicity.
A sample was considered mutagenic when the observed number of colonies was at least 2-fold over the spontaneous level of revertants.
Mutagenicity, measured as the number of net revertants per liter (rev/L), was assayed according to the plate incorporation method of Ames et al.
The number of revertants induced by 2-aminofluorene (AF2), 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) decreased dose-dependently (Figures 1, 2 and 3, respectively).