reversion

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reversion

 [re-ver´zhun]
a returning to a previous condition; regression.

re·ver·sion

(rē-ver'zhŭn),
1. The manifestation in an individual of certain characteristics, peculiar to a remote ancestor, which have been suppressed during one or more of the intermediate generations.
2. The return to the original phenotype, either by reinstatement of the original genotype (true reversion) or by a mutation at a site different from that of the first mutation, which cancels the effect of the first mutation (suppressor mutation).
[L. reversio (see reversal)]

reversion

/re·ver·sion/ (-ver´zhun)
1. regression (3).
2. in genetics, the mutation of a mutant phenotype so that the original function is restored; it includes mutation of the DNA such that the parental base sequence is regained (reverse mutation) .

reversion

(rĭ-vûr′zhən)
n.
1. A return to a former condition, belief, or interest.
2. A turning away or in the opposite direction; a reversal.
3. Genetics A return to the normal phenotype, usually by a second mutation.

reversion

[rivur′zhən]
1 the appearance in offspring of traits expressed in previous but not recent generations.
2 a return to an original phenotype, by mutation or reinstatement of the original genotype.

reversion

Cardiac pacing The automatic suspension of pacemaker inhibition in the face of certain types of electrical activity. See Pacemaker.

re·ver·sion

(rē-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. The manifestation in an individual of a set of characteristics, peculiar to a remote ancestor that have been suppressed during one or more of the intermediate generations.
2. The return to the original phenotype, either by reinstatement of the original genotype (true reversion) or by a mutation at a site different from that of the first mutation cancelling the effect of the first mutation (suppressor mutation).

reversion

a process in which a MUTANT regains the WILD-TYPE PHENOTYPE. This may occur by, for example, a back mutation that precisely restores the wild-type DNA sequence and therefore the wild-type phenotype, or by a SUPPRESSOR MUTATION that restores only the original phenotype. The resulting organism is called a revertant. see REVERSE MUTATION.

reversion

1. a returning to a previous condition; regression.
2. in genetics, inheritance from some remote ancestor of a character that has not been manifest for several generations.

Patient discussion about reversion

Q. I have been struggling with an eating disorder. Can I reverse this? Hi everybody! Here is Tom of 25 yrs old male. I have been struggling with an eating disorder. Now I have low bone density into the osteoporosis level. My level is -2.6. I'm still young, is there hope for me? Can I reverse this? Are there any herbs or other supplements that may help me?

A. most people who has eating disorder wouldn't believe you if you'll say them they have a problem. anorexic girls believe they are fat even when they are all skin and bones. you passed that stage. that stage was the hard one. not that you are facing an easy journey, but the hardest part is behind you. here is a site that will be a big help for you:

http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/p.asp?WebPage_ID=286&Profile_ID=41156

Q. I HAVE HEARD THERE IS A NEW DRUG THAT CAN NOT ONLY SLOW DOWN ALLZHEIMERS BUT REVERSE IT.WHERE CAN IT BE FOUND? ADVERTISMENTS HAVE SAID SOME DOCTORS ARE DOING TRIAL DOSES WITH THIS NEW TREATMENT AND MY MOMS DOCTOR COULDN'T FIND OUT WHERE TO GO AT OUR LAST VISIT.HELP US FIND AN AREA NEAREST TO CENTRAL AL AS POSSIBLE.

A. It's called dimebon, and it was indeed found to improve the condition of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease. You may read more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimebon and http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_67571.html

More discussions about reversion
References in periodicals archive ?
2014) compare the cash flows and risk profile of stylized reverse mortgage and home reversion plans from the perspective of the product provider.
3) 1 measure whether stock prices revert to market return after an initial reaction (trade) to the arrival of information and if the degree of reversion is positively related to the speed of the reaction.
reversions ([dagger]) Assumptions Revenue Schedule Growth rate land Starting rent $5,000 Disc.
Cavendish is permitted by the FSA to arrange and advice on norma regulated mortgage contracts, but this doesn't cover home reversion.
Home reversion plans have become popular with retired people wanting to boost their income by tapping into the booming property market.
The last decade has witnessed an increasing interest in the debate over mean reversion in stock market returns.
While reversions from those plans are legal, they are very uncommon because such reversions would be subject to a collective bargaining contract.
The excise tax payable on reversions to the employer on the termination of a pension plan has been increased from 15 percent to either 20 percent or 50 percent, depending on the employer's course of action after the plan is terminated.
Although the employer's right to reclaim excess pension assets has been disputed, the courts have found that reversions are consistent with the spirit of ERISA, noting that the purpose of ERISA is to protect employees to the extent of promised benefits, not to provide pension windfalls just because a plan is overfunded.
Unfortunately, this 25% rule can make contingent reversions and powers of appointment prohibitive when a grantor reaches his mid-60s, just when such instruments are most needed.
With regard to the hiring of an expert in a reversion situation, the Opinion recognizes that -- since defined contribution plan terminations do not involve reversions -- an independent expert need not be hired.
With home reversions, owners are lucky if they sell a stake in their home for more than 55 per cent of its open market value, but they also get rent-free occupation of the property for as long as they wish.