retrusion


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Related to retrusion: mandibular retrusion

retrusion

 [re-troo´zhun]
the state of being located posterior to the normal position, such as the mandible or a tooth displaced in the line of occlusion.

re·tru·sion

(rē-trū'zhŭn),
1. Retraction of the mandible from any given point.
2. The backward movement of the mandible.
[L. retrudo, pp. -trusus, to push back]

retrusion

/re·tru·sion/ (re-troo´zhun) the state of being located posterior to the normal position, such as the mandible or a tooth displaced in the line of occlusion.retru´sive

retrusion

See retroversion, def 2.

re·tru·sion

(rĕ-trū'zhŭn)
1. Retraction of the mandible from any given point.
2. The backward movement of the mandible.
3. The act or process of forcing something back.
[L. re-trudo, pp. -trusus, to push back]

re·tru·sion

(rĕ-trū'zhŭn)
1. Retraction of mandible from any given point.
2. Backward movement of mandible.
[L. re-trudo, pp. -trusus, to push back]

retrusion (rētroo´zhən),

n teeth or jaws posterior to their normal positions.
retrusion, mandibular,
n abnormal retrusion of the mandible, as in a Class II malocclusion.
retrusion, maxillary,
n abnormal retrusion of the maxillae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients requiring the type of surgical treatment presented in this paper usually have 1) nonsalvageable TMJ pathology, 2) major retrusion of the mandible, 3) retrusion of the maxilla, 4) anterior vertical maxillary excess and/or posterior vertical maxillary deficiency, 5) high occlusal plane angulation, 6) TMJ and jaw dysfunction, and 7) pain and headaches.
He does point out that long-term studies indicate that the only lasting effect of functional appliances is a retrusion of the midface, and not mandibular growth.
This bite is concomitant with a retrusion of the mandible, which, if uncorrected, leads to a breakdown of the supporting structures of the teeth.
Serial lateral cephalometric radiographs demonstrate slow but progressive retrusion of the mandible during the active resorption phase of the disease.
A 15-year-old girl with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis had severe destruction of the TMJs, resulting in a facial deformity (Figure 2a, 2b), progressively worsening mandibular retrusion (Figure 3a), and severe sleep apnea symptoms secondary to airway obstruction (Figure 4a).