retrograde

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retrograde

 [ret´ro-grād]
1. moving backward or against the usual direction of flow.
2. degenerating, deteriorating, or catabolic.

ret·ro·grade

(ret'rō-grād),
1. Moving backward.
2. Degenerating; reversing the normal order of growth and development.
3. Used in neuroscience to describe distal-proximal flow, movement, or transport in an axon toward its cell body, or degeneration of an axon proximal to a point of injury, such degenerative changes may extend to, and include, the cell body.
[L. retrogradus, fr. retro- + gradior, to go]

retrograde

/ret·ro·grade/ (ret´ro-grād) going backward; retracing a former course; catabolic.

retrograde

[ret′rəgrād]
Etymology: L, retro + gradus, step
1 moving backward; moving in the opposite direction to that which is considered normal.
2 degenerating; reverting to an earlier state or worse condition.
3 catabolic.

ret·ro·grade

(ret'rō-grād)
1. Moving backward.
2. Degenerating; reversing the normal order of growth and development.
[L. retrogradus, fr. retro-, back + gradior, to go]

retrograde

A going backwards or a reversion of the usual sequence.

ret·ro·grade

(ret'rō-grād)
1. Moving backward.
2. Degenerating; reversing the normal order of growth and development.
[L. retrogradus, fr. retro-, back + gradior, to go]

retrograde,

v to move backward, degenerate, or return to an earlier state or worse condition.

retrograde

going backward; retracting a former course; catabolic.

retrograde pyelography
radiography of the kidney after introduction of contrast medium through the ureter.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Army has done this in the past by dismantling outsized items and retrograding them by air in pieces or by staffing such items for destruction.
Since wheeled weapon systems, such as mine-resistant ambush-protected (MRAP) vehicles and M1151 up-armored high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicles, can move on their own, planners should consider retrograding the bulk of their heavier tracked systems earlier in the operation.