retrograde flow

retrograde flow

Etymology: L, retro, backward; AS, flowan
the flow of fluid in a direction other than normal, as in regurgitation.

retrograde flow

The flow of fluid in a direction opposite to that considered normal.
References in periodicals archive ?
The In-Line Check Valve is a DEHP-free, acrylic valve featuring a Latex Free silicone diaphragm that allows flow in one direction and will prevent retrograde flow (back pressure tested to 45 psi).
The retrograde flow from the LCA to the pulmonary artery is well depicted on MRI and is seen as a jet of blood flowing into the pulmonary artery.
Increasing circuit flows would most likely have made left heart distension worse by increasing mean arterial pressure and promoting retrograde flow through the aortic valve, and was therefore not attempted.
Unlike other needleless sites that allow for bidirectional flow, site 80189 incorporates a one-way injection-only valve designed to prevent retrograde flow.
This system of veins is valveless, thereby permitting retrograde flow and vascular dilation.
In addition, side effects from retrograde flow, such as nasal irritation and nosebleeds, are minimized with the pulse-wave delivery system.
Persistent arteriovenous shunting and extravasation were present at the skull base from retrograde flow through the intracranial right ICA (Figure 2).
The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command's Lean Six Sigma (LSS) staff combined forces with the Army Sustainment Command's Continuous Process Improvement office June 2008, to improve the ARI retrograde flow of equipment from OIF to CONUS source-of-repair (SOR) facilities.
This would allow metastases to bypass the lungs and spread to the head and neck by way of a retrograde flow through the valveless plexus.
At one base the second retrograde flow had no interface with the flight service center (FSC), except to exchange improperly addressed packages.
Symptoms such as the six used in the study to select subjects--chronic dry hacking cough, globus sensations, hoarseness, nocturnal cough, sore throat, and throat clearing--are generally attributed to retrograde flow of gastric contents, but diagnosis and management of supraesophageal reflux is difficult because of a lack of standardized criteria.