retrain

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retrain

(rē″trān′)
To instruct a person in a skill or trade different from his or her previous work. One may learn how to use new tools for a familiar task or to expand one's professional qualifications and employability.
retraining (″trān′ing)
References in periodicals archive ?
Albayalde said a committee led by the PNP Deputy Regional Director for Administration (DRDA) would continue to conduct a validation and evaluation of all those who completed the retraining.
In everyday terms, if a lab switches its brand of chemistry and the Material Safety Data Sheets for the new chemistry do not identify any hazards that are different from the old brand, there is no need for retraining the staff that works with that product.
Many counseling and retraining efforts do, in fact, amount to little more than support groups for jobless workers.
If welders can't do this for whatever reason, it can be very expensive for them to do the necessary retraining courses ( and if people can't afford to pay for a retraining course because they're not working, an obvious barrier is formed to them getting back into employment.
Disk libraries are a welcome exception in that they can be "dropped in" to an existing storage environment without the need for data migration, new software licenses, or retraining of the operations staff.
assessment forms, tracking forms, risk assessment forms), training manuals, hands-on staff training, and a retraining program?
There are four major programs that offer support to affected employees: Priority Placement System, Voluntary Separation Incentive Pay, Voluntary Early Retirement Authority and, if applicable, retraining.
This study analyzed entry data on dislocated airline employees in an effort to develop guidelines that would benefit future enrollees in retraining, the retraining organizations, and employers.
But Mr Colquhoun's decision leaves just two surgeons retraining at the unit which it is hoped will be operational again in April next year.
Both Egan and Osgood reinforced that spin by featuring only interviews with displaced workers pleased with their turn of fate, and recipients of government funds who conduct the retraining programs.
Yet the transformative power of retraining has become such an article of faith for the Administration--especially for Labor Secretary Robert Reich, with his vision of reskilled "symbolic analysts" flourishing in the Workplace of the Future--that officials quickly discounted the unhappy news: a flawed program, bad planning, more "entitlement" than genuine retraining.
Both employers and the rehabilitation system (Rasch, 1979) may deny opportunities for retraining to the older worker.