retrain


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retrain

(rē″trān′)
To instruct a person in a skill or trade different from his or her previous work. One may learn how to use new tools for a familiar task or to expand one's professional qualifications and employability.
retraining (″trān′ing)
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result of this there is a rapidly increasing need to retrain to get into an accounting and finance role, or even to become selfemployed.
He was able to retrain for a new career as a mobile crane operator.
No, you cannot retrain and if you do not like it, you are offered to simply not sign the job seekers agreement, which of course means "no, you cannot eat
If you were working in industry you would not expect to be asked to retrain during your personal holidays.
The program offers a curriculum designed to retrain pianists limited by pain, injury or tension while they pursue a degree option at PSU.
It is hoped this will stop would-be course candidates looking to retrain for a new career in IT losing interest because the existing loan application process typically takes four weeks to complete.
The sensible thing is to retrain the downsized workers and keep them off the jobless rolls.
Egan's optimism centers on government programs to retrain displaced wood-industry workers, or "beneficiaries," as Charles Osgood recently referred to them in a CBS piece on Oregon that paralleled Mr.
WCM companies must also retrain their vendors for JIT and RCM: This will enable them to deliver high-quality products on time.
A MIDDLESBROUGH travel agent who decided to go back to college and retrain in her 40s has been handed a regional award.
He is a chef and would like to retrain as a carpenter but there is nothing for anyone older - he is only 45.
Their contribution of pounds 5,000 is earmarked for a DVD to help new owners retrain their own exracehorse.