retractor

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retractor

 [re-trak´tor]
1. an instrument for holding open the edges of a wound or drawing back structures.
2. a muscle that draws a part back.

re·trac·tor

(rē-trak'tŏr, -tōr),
1. An instrument for drawing aside the edges of a wound or for holding back structures adjacent to the operative field.
2. A muscle that draws a body part backward, for example, the middle part of the trapezius muscle is a retractor of the scapula; the horizontal fibers of the temporalis muscle serve to retract the mandible.

retractor

/re·trac·tor/ (-trak´ter)
1. an instrument for holding open the lips of a wound.
2. a muscle that retracts.

retractor

(rĭ-trăk′tər)
n.
One that retracts, as:
a. Anatomy A muscle, such as a flexor, that retracts an organ or a part.
b. Medicine A surgical instrument used to hold back organs or the edges of an incision.

retractor

[ritrak′tər]
Etymology: L, retractare
an instrument for holding back the edges of tissues and organs to maintain exposure of the underlying anatomical parts, particularly during surgery.

retractor

Dentistry An orthodontic device used to facilitate posterior movement of misaligned teeth Surgery Any device used to hold wound margins, organs, or tissues away from an operative field. See Hohmann retractor, Scoville retractor.

re·trac·tor

(rē-trak'tŏr)
1. An instrument for drawing aside the edges of a wound or for holding back structures adjacent to the operative field.
2. A muscle that draws a part backward (e.g., the middle part of the trapezius muscle is a retractor of the scapula; the horizontal fibers of the temporalis muscle serve to retract the mandible).

retractor

An instrument used, often in pairs, to hold surgical incisions open or to keep tissue out of the way of the operating surgeon.

retractor

muscle whose action causes retrograde (backwards) movement of a part; contrast with protractor

re·trac·tor

(rē-trak'tŏr)
1. An instrument for drawing aside wound edges or holding back structures adjacent to operative field.
2. Muscle that draws a body part backward, e.g., middle part of trapezius muscle is a retractor of the scapula; horizontal fibers of temporalis muscle serve to retract the mandible.

retractor,

n an instrument for retracting tissues to assist in gaining access to an area of operation or observation.
retractor, beaver-tail,
n a broad-bladed periosteal elevator.
retractor, rake,
n a metallic instrument with prongs set transversely for engaging and retracting soft tissues.
retractor, vein hook,
n a metallic instrument ending in a rounded flange set transversely for engaging and retracting soft tissues.

retractor

1. an instrument for holding open the edges of a wound or edges of a fissure such as the eyelids.
2. a muscle that retracts.

flexible retractor
a simple surgical instrument made of metal, usually copper, and shaped like a simple spatula or tongue-depressor. It can be bent into any shape so as to get into tricky sites to hold back tissues. Usually bent into a hook shape.
Weitlaner retractor
References in periodicals archive ?
The margins of the rotator interval can be retracted with small Senn retractors.
Whatever model is chosen, the Manufacturers Lifetime Service Policy that comes as standard across all Retractor ranges offers optimum peace of mind.
Thus it is named after the author and the institute asMamun-TKC Parathyroid Retractor.
A selection of ends ranging from 30 to 65 mm in length is packaged with the retractor in a kit.
In this regard Arion, the Holarctic type genus of Arionidae, exhibits relatively advanced character states with, amongst others, the shell being almost totally degenerated and the retractor muscles of the left and right sides shortened to such a degree that they originate independently from the dorsolateral body wall.
If the bracket was installed properly and there's enough clearance for safe operation of the retractor, you're good to go.
Furthermore, the Spacekeeper Direct retractor from GSI, the main instrument involved in the skin bridging technique, provides clinicians the experience and training needed for endoscopy, offers patients a less invasive alternative than traditional open methods, and is an inexpensive alternative for hospitals.
If you begin an abdominal hysterectomy and find that your view is blocked by large fibroids, try this trick: Remove the self-retaining retractor and deliver the fundus through the incision.
Self-retaining retractors are helpful tools, but in certain cases you can do better without them.
The new SERENGETI Disposable Kit includes the retractors, pedicle access needles, guidewires, and the Perfect Scalpel([TM]), which can be threaded over the guidewire to create small incisions just large enough to fit the retractor.
Tenders are invited for Supply of Retractors Kelly 2"x3" made of surgical grade stainless steel compatible with above mentioned Bookwalter Retractor Oval Ring as well as above mentioned Ratchet Mechanism.
How have retractors and retractor systems changed to accommodate minimally invasive surgical techniques, and what should surgeons consider when choosing this instrumentation?