retinoschisis


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retinoschisis

 [ret″ĭ-nos´kĭ-sis]
splitting of the retina, occurring in the nerve fiber layer (in juvenile form), or in the external plexiform layer (in adult form).

ret·i·nos·chi·sis

(ret'i-nos'ki-sis),
Degenerative splitting of the retina, with cyst formation between the two layers.
[retino- + G. schisis, division]

retinoschisis

/ret·i·nos·chi·sis/ (ret″ĭ-nos´kĭ-sis) splitting of the retina, occurring in the nerve fiber layer (juvenile form), or in the external plexiform layer (adult form) .

retinoschisis

[ret′i·nos′ki·sis]
Etymology: L, rete, net + schisis, cleavage
splitting of the retina. In the juvenile form the splitting occurs in the nerve fiber layer (stratum opticum), and in the adult form in the outer plexiform layer. The disorder is usually more benign and slowly progressive than retinal detachment. Compare retinal detachment.

ret·i·nos·chi·sis

(ret'i-nos'ki-sis)
Degenerative splitting of the retina, with cyst formation between the two layers.
[retino- + G. schisis, division]

retinoschisis

Local splitting of the retina into two layers with an intervening space.

retinoschisis 

A vitreoretinal degeneration characterized by splitting of the retina into two layers. It occurs either as a hereditary disease or as an acquired condition (70% of these patients are hyperopic). The X-linked hereditary condition (called juvenile retinoschisis) affects only males and usually involves the macula with loss of central vision. The congenital condition is characterized by a splitting of the nerve fibre layer from the retina whereas the acquired form, which is the most common, results in a splitting at the outer plexiform layer. The latter usually begins in the temporal periphery appearing as a coalescence of microcystoid degenerations with a smooth transparent elevation and associated with an absolute scotoma. The condition may spread to involve the entire peripheral fundus. Holes in the two layers are common and are a sign of progression. The inner layer contains blood vessels and sometimes has small whitish flakes on it, which are called 'snowflakes'.

retinoschisis

splitting of the retina.
References in periodicals archive ?
Juvenile retinoschisis may be differentiated from degenerative retinoschisis based on the younger age of onset and the schisis occurring in the nerve fibre layer rather than in the outer plexiform layer as in degenerative retinoschisis.
Children with suspected juvenile X-linked retinoschisis should be referred for advanced testing and for genetic counselling.
As it is an area with continued research interest, there is hope for patients with juvenile X-linked retinoschisis.
12) They can coalesce and progress to retinoschisis but do not themselves lead to RD.
12) They may be associated with microcystoid areas and can progress to retinoschisis although the possibility is controversial.
However, this was not seen in this patient and instead the retinal appearance was one of possible retinal detachment or retinoschisis, given the elevated nature of the retina.
There is total loss of function in the affected area, resulting in an absolute scotoma, but there is no threat to sight because, unlike a retinal detachment, a retinoschisis does not progress from the periphery towards the macula.
05% of cases; (2) there is no need for prophylactic treatment of retinoschisis.
Optometrists who suspect a retinoschisis in an asymptomatic patient should refer on a routine basis and then monitor annually if the diagnosis is confirmed.
Thus, if an area of elevated retina has some features of retinoschisis but some that would suggest detachment then referral would have to be urgent.
d) The only peripheral retinal degeneration that may require referral is retinoschisis
The visual outcome of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis is variable and cannot be predicted based on the fundus findings alone.