cone cell

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cone cell

(kōn sel)
One of the two types of visual receptor cells of the retina, essential for visual acuity and color vision; the second type is the rod cell.

cone cell

A cell in the retina whose scleral end forms a cone that serves as a light receptor. Vision in bright light, color vision, and acute vision depend on the function of the cones. See: rod cell
See also: cell

cone cell

a cone-shaped cell sensitive to light, found throughout the retina of most vertebrate eyes but concentrated within the FOVEA (see RETINAL CONVERVENCE). Cones are concerned with discrimination of colour and with visual acuity. There are three types of cone cell, each containing a different IODOPSIN and each giving maximum response when stimulated by the blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), and red (550 nm) parts of the visible spectrum. Our perception of any given colour is produced by the relative degree to which each cone is stimulated by any given wavelength of visible light. This is in accord with the TRICHROMATIC THEORY of colour vision which suggests that all colours can be produced by the mixing of blue, green and red. Thus the brain detects a yellow light by the equal stimulation of red and green cone gells. A pigment defect in one or more of the types of cone cell can lead to COLOUR BLINDNESS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, lack of a between-group difference is most likely due to the absence of damage to the retinal cones and not due to the CCT lack of sensitivity.
His worthless retinal cones were still immune to color brightness--permanent, severe, congenital--but then she entered the room and colored his world like Morris' Guinevere.
In fact, zeaxanthin is the predominant carotenoid found in the central portion of the retina and, more specifically, is concentrated in the retinal cones located in the central area of the retina (the macula).