reticulated platelet

reticulated platelet

An incompletely developed platelet found in the peripheral blood that contains strands of mRNA or rRNA. Small numbers of circulating reticulated platelets, typically less than 5%, are found in blood as a result of normal maturation from megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. High levels of reticulated platelets appear in diseases in which platelets are rapidly destroyed, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)
Synonym: immature platelet; stress platelet
References in periodicals archive ?
14] Another approach was adopted by Kurata et al to assess reticulated platelet using RNA-binding dyes and flow cytometric analysers, as these reticulated platelets are newly released from the bone marrow which can help in determining the aetiology of thrombocytopenia.
The more immature the platelet, the more it fluoresces, thus allowing an accurate immature platelet count without requiring a separate reticulated platelet test performed by traditional flow cytometry.
These reticulated platelet data form the basis for further investigating the clinical utility of this assay in conditions of decreased and increased platelet production.
The reticulated platelet count can be used to determine the rate of thrombopoiesis.
The reticulated platelet assay can provide similar information, as the reticulated platelet count tends to vary proportionately with marrow function, and very high counts can be seen in the setting of peripheral platelet destruction.
It is anticipated that implementation of reticulated platelet counts may help to avoid bone marrow examination in some individuals with thrombocytopenia.
First and foremost, because reticulated platelet measurement is not part of the routine CBC, a new test must be ordered separately.
Reference intervals of reticulated platelets and other platelet parameters and their associations.
7 At present automated quantification of reticulated platelets has been used to discriminate between cases of severe thrombocytopenia and ITP.
The method involves the use of an organic dye in the reagent solution for staining the nucleic acid of reticulocytes, including reticulated platelets, and white blood cells in the sample.
Subsequent studies have shown the analysis of IPF on automated hematology analyzers to be a stable and reproducible parameter (10) compared to the measurement of reticulated platelets using flow cytometry (11-13) for providing information on thrombopoiesis.
A different approach was adopted by Kurata et al, who assessed reticulated platelets which are newly released from the marrow.