retention


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retention

 [re-ten´shun]
1. the process of holding back or keeping in a position.
2. persistence in the body of material normally excreted, such as from the bowel or bladder.
3. the number of staff members in a facility that remain in employment.
urinary retention a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual has incomplete emptying of the bladder.
retention of urine accumulation of urine within the bladder because of inability to urinate.

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn),
1. The keeping in the body of what normally belongs there, especially food and drink in the stomach.
See also: memory.
2. The keeping in the body of what normally should be discharged, as urine or feces.
See also: memory.
3. Retaining that which has been learned so that it can be used later as in recall, recognition, or, if retention is partial, relearning.
See also: memory.
4. Resistance to dislodgement.
5. In dentistry, a passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize the teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

retention

/re·ten·tion/ (re-ten´shun) the process of holding back or keeping in position, as persistence in the body of material normally excreted, or maintenance of a dental prosthesis in proper position in the mouth.

retention

(rĭ-tĕn′shən)
n.
1. The act of retaining or the condition of being retained: the retention of nutrients in the soil; the retention of jobs in the city.
2. The practice of requiring a student to repeat a class or a year of school because of insufficient educational progress to advance.
3. The ability to recall or recognize what has been learned or experienced; memory.
4. The inability of a person or animal to eliminate a bodily waste.

retention

[riten′shən]
1 a resistance to movement or displacement.
2 the ability of the digestive system to hold food and fluid.
3 the inability to urinate or defecate.
4 the ability of the mind to remember information acquired from reading, observation, or other processes.
5 the inherent property of a dental restoration to maintain its position without displacement under axial stress.
6 a characteristic of proper tooth cavity preparation in which provision is made for preventing vertical displacement of the cavity filling.
7 a period of treatment during which an individual wears an appliance to maintain teeth in positions to which they have been moved by orthodontic procedures. retain, v.

retention

Neurology See Memory UrologySee Urinary retention.

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn)
1. The keeping in the body of what normally belongs there, especially the retaining of food and drink in the stomach.
2. The keeping in the body of what normally should be discharged, such as urine or feces.
3. Retaining that which has been learned so that it can be used later as in recall, recognition, or, if retention is partial, relearning.
See also: memory
4. Resistance to dislodgement.
5. dentistry A passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize the teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
2. Resistance to dislodgement.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

retention (rēten´shən),

n 1. power to retain; capacity for retaining; the inherent property of a restoration to maintain its position without displacement under stress; results from close adaptation of the restoration to the prepared form of the tooth, usually aided by cement.
n 2. term relating to the provision in cavity preparation for preventing displacement of a restoration. Retention supplements resistance form and is specifically created to resist any lateral or tipping force that may be brought against the restoration during and after its insertion.
n 3. resistance of a denture to removal in a direction opposite that of its insertion; the quality inherent in the denture that resists the force of gravity, adhesiveness of foods, and forces associated with the opening of the jaws.
n 4. the period of treatment during which the individual wears an appliance to maintain the teeth in the desired position.
retention arm,
retention, circumferential,
n frictional resistance to displacement derived from completely veneering the exposed tooth surface.
retention, denture,
n 1. the means by which dentures are held in position in the oral cavity; the maintenance of a denture in its position in the oral cavity; the resistance to the movement of a denture from its basal seat in a direction opposite to that in which it was inserted.
n 2. the resistance of a denture to vertical movement in the occlusal direction from its basal seat.
retention, direct,
n retention obtained in a removable partial denture by the use of attachments or clasps that resist removal from abutment teeth.
retention form,
retention, indirect,
n retention obtained in a removable partial denture through the use of indirect retainers.
retention, partial denture,
n the fixation of a fixed partial denture by means of crowns, inlays, or other retainers.
retention, pin,
retention, pinhole,
n one or more small holes, 2 to 3 mm in depth, placed in suitable areas of a cavity preparation parallel with the general line of draft to provide or supplement resistance and retention form.
retention, radicular,
n retention derived from projections of metal into the root canals of pulpless teeth.
retention, removable partial denture,
n the resistance to movement of a removable partial denture from its supporting structures, gained by the use of direct and indirect retainers or other attachments.

retention

the process of holding back or keeping in a position, such as persistence in the body of material normally excreted. See also retained.

renal retention cysts
these are acquired and result from scarring and obstruction of tubules in chronic renal disease.
urine retention
accumulation of urine within the bladder because of inability to urinate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Companies aren't investing in organizationally-aligned retention strategies in the same way they do their brand and employer value proposition," said Steve Lopez, vice president, ManpowerGroup Solutions, Consulting & Solutions.
Schedule-based retention of email is consistent with half a century of records management practice for other types of written communications, but its practicality is questionable.
Retention is a common feature of construction projects across the globe.
Early identification of students who have a high potential to drop out of college has become a key concern of faculty and administrators involved with improving retention.
CRM systems usually start in Admissions as a way to keep track of recruitment activities, but they can also be used to enhance retention efforts.
The experts interviewed for this article cited several examples of performance chemical use that help improve machine efficiency, promote consistent retention and drainage, increase machine speed, and lower energy consumption.
Note: The samples in the exhibit are not endorsed documents but, rather, are examples prepared by working practitioners to aid firms in implementing or refining their own retention policies.
Although the measurement of property decay at elevated temperatures and subsequent extrapolation using an Arrhenius fit has been used to predict property retention at ambient temperatures, it is generally not satisfactory (ref.
A challenge for managing the retention process is to examine each possible storage location and decide on policies for its use.
However, record retention is necessary only to the extent it serves a useful purpose or satisfies legal requirements.
The district's decision to hire teachers for summer school--part of the retention plan--outside of union hiring rules created another furor.
To address these scandals, a plethora of industry and government regulations have been passed that mandate how information in any form, electronic or paper, must be managed and retained for a specific number of years imposing varying retention schedules for records.