retained bullet

A bullet that remains in the body after a gunshot, either because it wasn’t found or because it lodged in an inaccessible site or would create vascular or neural problems if removed

retained bullet

Forensic medicine A bullet that remains in the body after a gunshot, either because it wasn't found or because it lodged in an inaccessible site or would create vascular or neural problems if removed
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Once, in an effort to compare penetration and retained bullet weights of three handgun cartridges, I fired JHP's from each into a railroad tie.
Retained bullet fragments (RBFs) are an infrequently reported, but important, cause of lead toxicity; symptoms are often nonspecific and can appear years after suffering a gunshot wound (2,3).
Bullet removal is not routinely indicated for victims of gunshot injuries with retained bullet fragments (RBFs) unless they are a cause of immediate morbidity.
Radiographs revealed a retained bullet and metallic debris in the right femoral head (Fig.
Lead toxicity in a 14-year-old female with retained bullet fragments.
This situation is unique in that an exploratory procedure may not truly be necessary if concomitant organ injury is absent and the perforation is extraperitoneal, but conservative management with catheter drainage alone does not address the retained bullet.
Increased lead absorption and lead poisoning from a retained bullet.
A radiograph of the right elbow revealed a retained bullet within the confines of a well-defined cystic soft tissue lesion, posterior to the distal end of the humerus (Figure 1, arrowheads).
1] The usual source of environmental exposure to lead is paint in old houses that are dilapidated or undergoing renovation[2] Few cases of elevated lead levels from retained bullet fragments have been reported in the literature.
The indication for surgery to remove a bullet is controversial because presence of retained bullets or bone fragments do not increase intracranial infection rate and removal of the same to prevent infection is unnecessary (1,2).
The most common nonoccupational exposures to lead were shooting firearms; remodeling, renovating, or painting; retained bullets (gunshot wounds); and lead casting.
The most common nonoccupational exposures were shooting firearms; remodeling, renovating, or painting; retained bullets (gunshot wounds); and eating food containing lead.