resuscitate

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re·sus·ci·tate

(rē-sŭs'i-tāt),
To perform resuscitation.
[L. resuscito, to raise up again, revive]

resuscitate

(rĭ-sŭs′ĭ-tāt′)
tr.v. resusci·tated, resusci·tating, resusci·tates
To restore consciousness or other signs of life to (one who appears dead): resuscitated the man after cardiac arrest.

re·sus′ci·ta·ble (-tə-bəl) adj.
re·sus′ci·ta′tion n.
re·sus′ci·ta′tive adj.

re·sus·ci·tate

(rē-sŭs'i-tāt)
To perform resuscitation.
[L. resuscito, to raise up again, revive]
References in periodicals archive ?
Determining a standard approach to resuscitation treatment and interventions is the role of the New Zealand Resuscitation Council, on which I represent NZNO.
Education is a priority for the council, and many nurses will be familiar with its qualification, the Certificate of Resuscitation and Emergency Care (CORE).
Being trained in resuscitation is a bit like having an insurance policy--you hope you won't have to use it, but it's there if you need it.
The inclusion criteria were that the participants had to have been employed in either of the units for more than 6 months, and that they had been exposed to the resuscitation procedure more than twice in order to make sure that the participant had sufficient exposure.
One participant explained: 'Witnessed resuscitation is when you have a patient who collapses in front of you and you are there when the arrest occurs in your presence'.
Others explained that it is resuscitation initiated by health professionals: 'Witnessed resuscitation is resuscitation conducted by qualified persons or qualified group initiated and conducted by that same group'.
The Rule of 10 allows the combat prehospital providers at levels I and II echelons of care to easily implement the fluid resuscitation, and then to shift the focus towards the patient's response to the resuscitation in order to dictate the amount of fluid administered over the first 24 hours.
Given that variations in practice exist among different sets of providers, variability in the way care is delivered during the resuscitation is unavoidable.
Key words: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation * critical care * family witnessed resuscitation * ethical decision making
Traditionally, the exclusion of family members (FM) from witnessing the resuscitation of a loved one has been justified on a number of grounds (Osuagwu, 1991; Mitchell & Lynch, 1997; Van der Woning, 1999).
With products for defibrillation and monitoring, circulation and CPR feedback, data management, fluid resuscitation, and therapeutic temperature management, ZOLL provides a comprehensive set of technologies which help clinicians, EMS and fire professionals, and lay rescuers treat victims needing resuscitation and critical care.
The next Australasian area conference on resuscitation will be in Auckland next April, hosted by the NZRC.