restriction

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restriction

 [re-strik´shun]
1. something that limits; a limitation.
2. see restriction endonuclease.
area restriction in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the limitation of patient mobility to a specified area for purposes of safety or behavior management.
fluid restriction the limitation of oral fluid intake to a prescribed amount for each 24-hour period. This therapeutic measure is indicated in patients who have edema associated with kidney disease, such as nephrosis and glomerulonephritis, or Laënnec's cirrhosis, and also in certain patients with pulmonary edema.
Patient Care. Approaches to the problem of discomfort from thirst and dryness of the mouth include careful distribution of the fluid intake over the entire 24 hours in small, frequent drinks; giving oral medications at mealtime, when not contraindicated, so as to allow sips of liquid at other times; providing cold water for rinsing the mouth without swallowing between drinks; giving hard candy and chewing gum; and allowing patients to choose the fluids they prefer to drink. Frequent mouth care with a refreshing mouthwash also is helpful.

re·stric·tion

(rē-strik'shŭn),
1. The use or action of restriction endonucleases (that is, site-specific deoxyribonucleases).
2. The process by which foreign DNA that has been introduced into a prokaryotic cell becomes ineffective.
3. A limitation.

restriction

/re·stric·tion/ (re-strik´shun) anything that limits; also, a limitation.restric´tive
intrauterine growth restriction  (IUGR) see under restriction.

restriction

A limitation placed on a UK practitioner’s practice, often in the context of a General Medical Council (GMC) proceeding—e.g., Fitness to Practise Hearing—which, if ignored by the practitioner, would result in disciplinary action by the GMC.

restriction

Hospital practice The narrowing or limiting of a health care provider's unrestricted practice of medicine by a licensing or certifying authority, due to activities determined to be illegal or at least of questionable medical judgement. Cf Revocation Nutrition The limiting of ingestion of a substance. See Caloric restriction, Protein restriction Vox populi Any limiting of an activity. See Host-controlled restriction, Intrauterine growth restriction, MHC restriction.

re·stric·tion

(rĕ-strik'shŭn)
1. The process in which foreign DNA that has been introduced into a prokaryotic cell becomes ineffective.
2. A limitation avoidance of some, such as dietary items.

restriction,

n a barrier or limit to movement.

restriction 

An interference in normal eye movement. This is most often due to the development of abnormal tissue that acts to limit free movement of the eye. See Graves' disease.

Patient discussion about restriction

Q. Is anyone restricted to have barley? what is the benefit of having barley and what is the best way to consume them? Is anyone restricted to have barley?

A. It grows in many parts of the world. As it is a whole grain it is good for health. It has soluble fiber and reduces blood cholesterol and glucose. It is low in fat content. No fixed way is there to eat barley as it’s used as soup thickener; it’s used in baked foods. Many breakfast foods include barley as baked breads. It is found to harm none.

Q. Is exercise recommended during pregnancy, if yes, are there any restrictions during pregnancy? I am in my 13 weeks of pregnancy. I always try to keep me fit and I do cycling every morning, swimming and yoga. These days I feel my body is changing and I am feeling more tiresome and nauseated. Is exercise recommended during pregnancy, if yes, are there any restrictions during pregnancy?

A. I exercised all through my pregnancies. I only gained a total of 10-12 pounds each time. I had easy deliveries because of the exercise. This has nothing to do with nausea. I had 9 months of nausea the first time around. Don't overdo the exercise, walking is the best exercise ever, and I climbed hills and stairs and walked several miles a day. My shortest delivery time was 5 minutes. I almost did not make it to the hospital. All my babies were healthy.

Q. What actions should i take in order to keep my self in a sharp and restricted fitness control?

A. I would try some body weight circuits 3 to 4 times a week.

More discussions about restriction
References in periodicals archive ?
end, restrictionists would likely argue that states that grant
Politically, self-deportation is a critical component of the broader restrictionist strategy since, as its proponents openly acknowledge, even during the current period of heightened anti-immigrant sentiment," political support for a new commitment to enforcement might well be undermined if an exodus of biblical proportions were to be televised in every American living room" (Ibid.
A principal purpose of the Charter, according to restrictionists,
to affirm a culture of encounter, hospitality and cordial welcome for migrants, and to identify positive examples where churches have worked together effectively to offer alternatives to restrictionist policies;
Glaap's "Views on the Holocaust in Contemporary Canadian Plays" reviews both Canadian political history and reflection there upon in Canadian theatre with reference to Canada's racist and anti-Semitic restrictionist immigration policies that saw only 5,000 Jewish refugees admitted to Canada during the twelve-year Nazi Regime.
But if they do, they are not going to get anywhere because Congress appears to have moved in the restrictionist direction.
7) "Gekas Announces Restrictionist Immigration Bill," AILA InfoNet, Doc.
Despite this new restrictionist climate, however, the country also adopted a liberal front-door immigration policy, and re-established a special refugee category which permitted the continued immigration of Jews from the former Soviet Union to Germany (Harris, 1997a; 1997b).
Tinged by a distinctly anti-Mexican tilt, [4] California's Proposition 187, which swept to a landslide victory in the November 1994 elections, [5] marked the beginning of the restrictionist onslaught.
That these governments did not uniformly practice what they preached--spectacularly so in President Ronald Reagan's reckless fiscal policy or Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's increase in regulation and centralization--did not detract from the pressure they put on the World Bank to promote restrictionist, liberalizing policies and to use broad conditionalities to impose them on clients.
Restrictionist proponents argue that current policy is too lenient and that foreign-born individuals take away jobs, depress wages, exploit public programs, overwhelm ports-of-entry, and lead to deterioration in the quality of U.
The European Parliament, for example, has already threatened to invoke restrictionist measures of its own, the so-called Metten resolution proposed by Alman Metten of the Netherlands.