restoration

(redirected from restoration groove)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

restoration

 [res″to-ra´shun]
1. induction of a return to a previous state, as a return to health or replacement of a part to normal position.
3. partial or complete reconstruction of a body part.
4. the device used for such a reconstruction.
oral health restoration in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of healing for a patient who has an oral mucosa or dental lesion.

res·to·ra·tion

(res'tō-rā'shŭn), In dentistry:
1. A prosthetic restoration or appliance; a broad term applied to any inlay, crown, bridge, partial denture, or complete denture that restores or replaces lost tooth structure, teeth, or oral tissues.
2. A plug or stopping; any substance (for example, gold, amalgam) used for restoring the portion missing from a tooth as a result of removing decay in the tooth.
[L. restauro, pp. -atus, to restore, to repair]

restoration

/res·to·ra·tion/ (res″tŏ-ra´shun)
1. induction of a return to a previous state, as a return to health or replacement of a part to normal position.
2. partial or complete reconstruction of a body part, or the device used in its place.restor´ative

restoration

[res′tôrā′shən]
Etymology: L, restaurare, to restore
any tooth filling, inlay, crown, partial or complete denture, or prosthesis that restores or replaces missing tooth structure, entire teeth, or oral tissues. Also called dental restoration, prosthetic restoration.

res·to·ra·tion

(res'tŏr-ā'shŭn)
1. dentistry A prosthetic restoration or appliance; a broad term applied to any inlay, crown, bridge, partial denture, or complete denture that restores or replaces lost tooth structure, teeth, or oral tissues.
2. A plug or stopping; any substance, such as gold or amalgam, used for restoring the portion missing from a tooth as a result of the removal of decay from the tooth.
[L. restauro, pp. -atus, to restore, to repair]

res·to·ra·tion

(res'tŏr-ā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, prosthetic restoration or appliance; broad term applied to any inlay, crown, bridge, partial denture, or complete denture that restores or replaces lost tooth structure, teeth, or oral tissues.
2. A plug or stopper; any substance (e.g., gold, amalgam) used for restoring missing portion of a tooth as a result of removing decay in tooth.
[L. restauro, pp. -atus, to restore, to repair]

restoration,

n (prosthetic restoration), broad term applied to any filling, inlay, crown, bridge, partial denture, or complete denture that restores or replaces lost tooth structure, teeth, or oral tissues; a prosthesis.
restoration, amalgam,
n a direct restoration made from an alloy consisting of mercury and other metals (e.g., silver, copper, or tin), which is carved and contoured after placement in the tooth; allow a minimum of 24 hours between placement and polishing.
Enlarge picture
Amalgam restoration.
restoration, ceramic,
n an indirect restoration made from metal and nonmetal compounds, which is carved and contoured before placement in the tooth; closely resembles natural teeth in strength, hardness, chemical inertness, and esthetic appearance.
restoration, dental prosthetic,
restoration, direct,
n a restoration prepared for immediate application to the tooth or cavity, as opposed to one prepared on a diagnostic cast and applied later.
restoration, faulty,
n restoration in which there are imperfections or incorrect attributes (e.g., overhanging or deficient fillings, incorrect anatomy of occlusal and marginal ridge areas, faulty clasps). Such faults may be present in individual tooth restorations, fixed bridges, and removable partial dentures and are conducive to the initiation and perpetuation of inflammatory and dystrophic diseases of the teeth and periodontium.
restoration groove,
n an opening between the restoration and the tooth structure, which results from either a broken flash or a material contraction; may also be called
ditch.
restoration, implant,
n the single-tooth implant crown or multiple-tooth implant, crown, or bridge that replaces a missing tooth or teeth.
restoration of cusps,
n (preferred to tipping, capping, or shoeing cusps), reduction and inclusion of cusps within a cavity preparation and their restoration to functional occlusion with restorative material.
restoration, overcontoured,
n a restoration containing so much excess restorative material that normal anatomic structure is altered; may cause plaque retention and open or deficient gingival margin.
restoration, PFM,
n also called a
porcelain-fused-to-metal restoration. A restoration made up of a metal substructure covered by an esthetic ceramic coating.
restoration, porcelain,
n an indirect restoration made from a ceramic material that is cast in a laboratory prior to insertion in the oral cavity and finished during placement. See also ceramic restoration.
Enlarge picture
Porcelain restoration.
restoration, prosthetic,
restoration, temporary,
n an artificial prosthesis used for a limited period to provide protective function and esthetics until a definitive prosthesis can be fixed into place.
restoration, undercontoured,
n a restoration containing too little restorative material so that a space occurs between the margin and the cavity wall; may result when either the matrix band or wedge is improperly placed.

restoration

1. induction of a return to a previous state, as a return to health or replacement of a part to normal position.
2. partial or complete reconstruction of a body part, or the device used in its place.

dental restoration
see restorative dentistry.

Patient discussion about restoration

Q. What are the opportunities to restore gums? My gum on the lower jaw gets less and less, opening the roots of my teeth. Is there any technology or recurement to stop it and, hopefully, draw back?

A. Treatment of receding gums start with treating the cause - improving overall oral hygiene, including brushing habits (too powerful brushing may damage the gums), as well as periodic tooth cleaning at the dentist.

More sever situation may necessitate treatments done by a dentist. Consulting one may be wise.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/1136.htm

More discussions about restoration
Full browser ?