restitution

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restitution

 [res″tĭ-too´shun]
the spontaneous realignment of the fetal head with the fetal body, after delivery of the head.

res·ti·tu·tion

(res'ti-tū'shŭn),
In obstetrics, the return of the rotated head of the fetus to its natural relation with the shoulders after its emergence from the vulva.
[L. restitutio, act of restoring]

restitution

/res·ti·tu·tion/ (res″tĭ-too´shun) the spontaneous realignment of the fetal head with the fetal body, after delivery of the head.

restitution

[res′tit(y)o̅o̅′shən]
the spontaneous turning of the fetal head to the right or left after it has extended through the vulva.

res·ti·tu·tion

(res'ti-tū'shŭn)
obstetrics The return of the rotated head of the fetus to its natural relation with the shoulders after its emergence from the vulva.
[L. restitutio, act of restoring]
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, it is not the case that these pleasures cannot be subsumed under the restitutive model.
The extent to which either defensive or restitutive uses of force should be supervised by or delegated to an impartial third party, in order to prevent the familiar Lockean problem of judgment in one's own case, will depend on the availability of such third parties and the urgency of the need for a forceful response.
Nozick focuses on the right of the aspiring minimal state to suppress unreliable competitors--that is, competitors whose defensive, restitutive, or retributive activities pose an unacceptable risk of violating the rights of the aspiring minimal state's clients.
Pace volumes of criticism claiming Shakespeare for conservatism, close examination of the entire Cade sequence, restitutive of contemporary contexts, alert to shifts both in mode and tone, discloses a quite contrary political creature.
On symbiotic child psychosis; genetic, dynamic, and restitutive aspects.
He claims the latter as problematic, suggesting that a different form of management could involve a "rationally regulated, restitutive process of co-production between humans and nature" (2002: 34).
A far better interpretation of the phrase, he decided, is that it includes only relief that typically was available in equity, such as injunctive or restitutive relief.
The lack of a shared bi-partisan conception of what constitutes social justice (including land rights) however, means that Aboriginal people are still left in the uncertain position of successive governments having the power to change any restitutive actions taken by previous governments.
Moral paradoxes of legal justice: an analysis of restitutive and administrative dealing with the past
of law, while complex societies embrace restitutive approaches.
It is generally recognized that wieder like again and its counterpart in Norwegian (igjen) has two major uses, a REPETITIVE use (2) where it is often interchangeable with noch einmal, erneut (once more, anew; nok en gang, pany), and a RESTITUTIVE (reversive, (3) restorative (4)) use (3) implying the restoration of a state that has held before.
The shade-grown coffee farm provides a textbook example of a restitutive relationship between the farmer and the land--what is removed is returned.