fixed macrophage

(redirected from resting wandering cell)

fixed mac·ro·phage

a relatively immotile macrophage found in connective tissue, lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow.

fixed macrophage

Etymology: L, figere, to fasten; Gk, makros, large, pagein, to eat
a nonmotile mononuclear phagocyte found in connective tissue, liver sinuses, spleen, lymph glands, and bone marrow.

fix·ed mac·ro·phage

(fikst mak'rō-fāj)
A relatively immotile macrophage found in connective tissue, lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under this rather indefinite term, "cells of the blood vessel walls" (Gefasswandzellen), evidently different cell types can be understood: the endothelium proper, certain cells of embryonic character, adjacent to the outer surface of the endothelium, the resting wandering cells or histiocytes, etc.
A part arises through the mobilization of the local resting wandering cells (clasmatocytes, histiocytes) of the connective tissue; another part comes from the blood and represents hematogenous, emigrated lymphocytes and monocytes.
HISTIOCYTES OR RESTING WANDERING CELLS (CLASMATOCYTES)
In confirmation of the previous findings of Maximow,(2) the polyblasts, the mononuclear exudate cells in the inflamed tissue, arise partly through mobilization of the local histiocytes, the resting wandering cells of the loose connective tissue, and partly through rapid hypertrophy of the emigrated lymphocytes and monocytes.
Maximow[2] believed that the resting wandering cells were the main source of macrophages, whereas Foot[3] argued that the endothelial cells were the primary source.