resting tremor


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tremor

 [trem´or, tre´mor]
an involuntary trembling of the body or limbs; it may have either a physical or a psychological cause. Early symptoms include trembling of the hands and nodding of the head. Tremors are often associated with parkinson's disease, which affects nerve centers in the brain that control the muscles. They also occur in cerebral palsy, hyperthyroidism, and withdrawal from narcotics or alcohol. They tend to develop as one of the results of aging, and are sometimes symptoms of temporary abnormal conditions such as insulin shock, or of poisoning, especially metallic poisoning. They sometimes appear with a high fever resulting from an infection. Tremors of psychological origin take many forms, some minor and some serious. Violent, uncontrollable trembling is often seen in certain phases of severe mental disorders. If there is no physiological cause, they may be a sign of general tension.
action tremor rhythmic, oscillatory movements of the outstretched upper limb when voluntary movements are attempted, as when writing or lifting a cup; it may also affect the voice and other parts. Called also intention tremor and volitional tremor.
coarse tremor that involving large groups of muscle fibers contracting slowly.
essential tremor a hereditary tremor with onset at varying ages, usually at about 50 years of age, beginning with a fine rapid tremor (as distinct from that of parkinsonism) of the hands, followed by tremor of the head, tongue, limbs, and trunk; it is aggravated by emotional factors, is accentuated by volitional movement, and in some cases is temporarily improved by alcohol.
fine tremor one in which the vibrations are rapid.
flapping tremor asterixis.
intention tremor action tremor.
parkinsonian tremor a type of resting tremor commonly seen with parkinsonism, consisting of slow, regular movements of the hands and sometimes the legs, neck, face, or jaw; it typically stops upon voluntary movement of the part and is intensified by stimuli such as cold, fatigue, and strong emotions.
physiologic tremor a rapid transient tremor of extremely low amplitude found in the limbs and sometimes the neck or face of normal individuals, only subtly detectable on an electromyogram and seldom visible to the naked eye; it may become accentuated and visible under certain conditions.
rest tremor (resting tremor) one occurring in a relaxed and supported limb, such as a parkinsonian tremor.
senile tremor one due to the infirmities of old age.
volitional tremor action tremor.

rest·ing trem·or

a coarse, rhythmic tremor, 3-5 Hz frequency, usually confined to hands and forearms, which appears when the limbs are relaxed and disappears with active limb movements; characteristic of Parkinson disease.
Synonym(s): passive tremor

resting tremor

an involuntary tremor occurring when the person is at rest. It is one of the signs of Parkinson's disease. Also called passive tremor. See also action tremor, tremor.

rest·ing trem·or

(rest'ing trem'ŏr)
A coarse, rhythmic tremor, 3-5 Hz frequency, usually confined to hands and forearms, which appears when the limbs are relaxed, and disappears with active limb movements; characteristic of Parkinson disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Resting tremors -- They happen while you are sitting or lying down.
Acetylcholine (ACh) is an essential part of this pathway, and in the absence of dopamine, ACh activity is increased--possibly contributing to the development of resting tremor in PD.
A resting tremor of right upper extremity was seen, which worsened with action.
4 [+ or -] 6 SD)] Clinical features [n with feature/n with data available (%)] Resting tremor 21/22 (95) 66/73 (90) Bradykinesia 22/23 (96) 70/74 (95) Rigidity 23/23 (100) 72/73 (99) Postural reflex impairment 10/21 (48) 43/62 (69) Asymmetric onset 23/23 (100) 69/71 (97) Response to dopaminergic therapy (if 21/21 (100) 63/65 (97) prescribed) Any oxidative stressor Characteristic Exposed Not exposed (n = 35) (n = 53) Age at PD diagnosis [years (mean 59 [+ or -] 8 64 [+ or -] 9 * [+ or -] SD)] PD duration [years (mean [+ or -] 8.
Primary parkinsonism, in which symptoms typically start on one side of the body before spreading to the other; resting tremor is often present; and there is a clinical response to levodopa therapy.
Two subjects had intention tremor, and three had both intention and resting tremor.
Resting tremor can be a socially devastating motor symptom even though this type of tremor has minimal impact on the ability to perform activities of daily living.
Resting tremor occurs when the limbs are fully supported, as is the case when one is sitting in an armchair.
Parkinson's Disease ("PD") is a progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by debilitating physical symptoms including resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and gait dysfunction2,3.
These participants must have at least three of the following signs of Parkinson's disease: resting tremor, bradykinesia (slowed movement), rigidity, and asymmetry, and must not require PD medication for at least six months.