vital capacity

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capacity

 [kah-pas´ĭ-te]
the power to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb; usually expressed numerically as the measure of such ability.
closing capacity (CC) the volume of gas in the lungs at the time of airway closure, the sum of the closing volume and the residual volume. See also closing volume.
decreased intracranial adaptive capacity a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which intracranial fluid dynamic mechanisms that normally compensate for increases in intracranial volumes are compromised, resulting in repeated disproportionate increases in intracranial pressure in response to a variety of noxious and nonnoxious stimuli.
diffusing capacity see diffusing capacity.
forced vital capacity the maximal volume of gas that can be exhaled from full inhalation by exhaling as forcefully and rapidly as possible. See also pulmonary function tests.
functional residual capacity the amount of gas remaining at the end of normal quiet respiration.
heat capacity the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a specific quantity of a substance by one degree Celsius.
inspiratory capacity the volume of gas that can be taken into the lungs in a full inhalation, starting from the resting inspiratory position; equal to the tidal volume plus the inspiratory reserve volume.
maximal breathing capacity maximum voluntary ventilation.
thermal capacity heat capacity.
total lung capacity the amount of gas contained in the lung at the end of a maximal inhalation.
 Subdivisions of total lung capacity: TLC, total lung capacity; V, tidal volume; IC, inspiratory capacity; FRC, functional residual capacity; ERV, expiratory reserve volume; VC, vital capacity; RV, residual volume. From Dorland's, 2000.
virus neutralizing capacity the ability of a serum to inhibit the infectivity of a virus.
vital capacity (VC) see vital capacity.

vital

 [vi´tal]
pertaining to life; necessary to life.
vital capacity (VC) the greatest volume of gas that, following maximum inhalation, can be expelled during a complete, slow, forced exhalation; equal to inspiratory capacity plus expiratory reserve volume.



Forced vital capacity (FVC) is the greatest volume of air that can be expelled when a person performs a rapid, forced exhalation, which usually takes about five seconds. The greatest volume of air a person can exhale during one, two, three, or more seconds of forced exhalation is called the forced expiratory volume (FEV). A subscript is added to the abbreviation FEV to indicate the phase during which the particular amount or volume of air is exhaled. A volume exhaled during the first second is designated FEV1.0, a volume exhaled during the first two seconds is designated FEV2.0, and so on. The rate at which a specified volume of air is exhaled during a forced exhalation is called forced expiratory flow (FEF). The rate at which air is exhaled from a forced expiratory volume of 200 mL to one of 1200 mL is designated FEF200–1200 (formerly called maximal expiratory flow, MEF); the rate from 25 to 75 per cent of the forced vital capacity is designated FEF25–75% (formerly called maximal midexpiratory flow, MMF).

Laboratory values for vital capacity, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume, and forced expiratory flow are usually reported both as absolute values and as statistically derived predicted values based on the age, sex, and height of a patient. The statistical value is reported as a percentage. See also pulmonary function tests.

vi·tal ca·pac·i·ty (VC),

the greatest volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs after a maximum inspiration.

vital capacity

n.
The amount of air that can be forcibly expelled from the lungs after breathing in as deeply as possible.

vital capacity (VC)

Etymology: L, vita, life, capacitas, capacity
the maximum volume of air that can be expelled at the normal rate of exhalation after a maximum inspiration, representing the greatest possible breathing capacity. The VC equals the inspiratory reserve volume plus the tidal volume plus the expiratory reserve volume. The average normal value of 4 to 5 L is affected by age, the physical dimensions of the chest cage, physical fitness, posture, and gender. The VC may be reduced by a decrease in the amount of functioning lung tissue resulting from atelectasis, edema, fibrosis, pneumonia, pulmonary resection, or tumors; by limited chest expansion resulting from ascites, chest deformity, neuromuscular disease, pneumothorax, or pregnancy; or by airway obstruction. Compare forced expiratory volume, forced expired vital capacity, residual volume.

vital capacity

Lung physiology The volume of air exhaled by a maxium expiration after a maxium inspiration. See Lung volumes. Cf Total lung capacity.

vi·tal ca·pa·ci·ty

(VC) (vī'tăl kă-pas'i-tē)
The greatest volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs after a maximum inspiration.
Synonym(s): respiratory capacity.

vital capacity

The volume of air that can be expelled from the lungs by a full effort following a maximal inspiration.
Vital capacityclick for a larger image
Fig. 316 Vital capacity . The vital capacity of an adult man at rest.

vital capacity

the total amount of air that can be expired after a maximum inspiration (deep breath). This is calculated as the sum of:
  1. (a) the tidal volume, the amount of air taken in with a normal breath.
  2. (b) the inspiratory reserve volume, the amount of air which can still be taken in after a normal breath.
  3. (c) the expiratory reserve volume, the amount of air which can be expelled after breathing out normally.

Typical results from an adult man at rest are shown in Fig. 316. Thus the vital capacity of a normal man is between 3.5 and 4.5 dm3, but can reach 6.0 dm3 in a trained athlete.

Vital capacity (VC)

The largest amount of air expelled after one's deepest inhalation.

vital capacity

the volume of air that can be inspired with maximal effort after forcefully emptying the lungs, or expired from full lung volume. See also lung volumes.

vital capacity,

n the maximum amount of air that can be expelled following maximum inhalation, representing the maximum breathing capacity. Used to determine the condition of the lung function.

vi·tal ca·pa·ci·ty

(VC) (vī'tăl kă-pas'i-tē)
The greatest volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs after a maximum inspiration.
Synonym(s): respiratory capacity.

capacity

the power to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb; usually expressed numerically as the measure of such ability.

carrying capacity
closing capacity (CC)
the volume of gas in the lungs at the time of airway closure. See also closing volume.
forced vital capacity
the maximal volume of gas that can be exhaled from full inspiration exhaling as forcefully and rapidly as possible. See also pulmonary function tests.
functional residual capacity
the amount of gas remaining at the end of normal quiet respiration.
heat capacity
thermal capacity.
inspiratory capacity
the volume of gas that can be taken into the lungs in a full inspiration, starting from the resting inspiratory position; equal to the tidal volume plus the inspiratory reserve volume.
maximal breathing capacity
maximal voluntary ventilation.
thermal capacity
the amount of heat absorbed by a body in being raised 1°C.
total lung capacity
the amount of gas contained in the lung at the end of a maximal inspiration.
virus neutralizing capacity
the ability of a serum to inhibit the infectivity of a virus.
vital capacity
the volume of gas that can be expelled from the lungs from a position of full inspiration, with no limit to duration of expiration; equal to inspiratory capacity plus expiratory reserve volume.

vital

pertaining to life; necessary to life.

vital capacity
the greatest volume of gas that, following maximum inspiration, can be expelled during a complete, slow, unforced expiratory maneuver; equal to inspiratory capacity plus expiratory reserve volume. This is a commonly made and practicable measurement in humans but is not so in animals.
vital red
dye injected into the circulation to estimate blood volume by calculating the concentration of the dye in the plasma.
vital signs
the signs of life, namely pulse, respiration and temperature.
vital statistics
that branch of biometry dealing with the data and laws of animal mortality, morbidity, natality and demography.
vital statistic rate
vital statistics presented as a proportion of a population, e.g. fetal deaths as a percentage of total births. Includes case fatality rate, nonreturn rate at 60 days.
References in periodicals archive ?
It appears that age-related loss of lung tissue elasticity and attendant stiffening of the chest wall are the prime factors in reduced respiratory capacity (universally occurring in sedentary individuals).
Myotrophin also delayed onset of disease-related morbidity as measured by time until a deterioration in respiratory capacity (FVC) or advanced stage of disease (Appel total score greater than or equal to 115).
While the trial is primarily evaluating the safety of the cells and procedure, it will also seek some secondary efficacy endpoints including attenuation of motor function loss, maintenance of respiratory capacity, and stabilization of patients along the ALS functional rating scale.