respirator


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respirator

 [res´pĭ-ra″tor]
1. an apparatus that qualifies air breathed through it, to be distinguished from a ventilator.
2. frequently used misnomer for ventilator (def. 2).
Drinker respirator a formerly common but now rarely used type of ventilator that provides controlled, automatic breathing for a patient whose respiratory muscles are paralyzed; it consists of a metal tank, enclosing the patient's body with the head outside, within which artificial respiration is maintained by alternating negative and positive pressure. It was instrumental in the treatment of the poliomyelitis epidemic of the early decades of the 20th century. Popularly known as iron lung.

res·pi·ra·tor

(res'pi-rā'tŏr, -tōr),
1. An apparatus for administering artificial respiration in cases of respiratory failure.
2. An appliance fitting over the mouth and nose, used for the purpose of excluding dust, smoke, or other irritants, or of otherwise altering the air before it enters the respiratory passages. Synonym(s): inhaler (1)
Synonym(s): ventilator

respirator

/res·pi·ra·tor/ (res´pĭ-ra″ter) ventilator (2).
cuirass respirator  see under ventilator.
Drinker respirator  popularly, “iron lung”: an apparatus formerly in wide use for producing artificial respiration over long periods of time, consisting of a metal tank, enclosing the patient's body, with the head outside, and within which artificial respiration is maintained by alternating negative and positive pressure.

respirator

(rĕs′pə-rā′tər)
n.
2. A device worn over the mouth or nose or both to protect the respiratory tract from harmful dust or fumes.

respirator

[res′pirā′tər]
Etymology: L, respirare
an apparatus used to modify air for inspiration or to improve pulmonary ventilation. The term is commonly used to mean a ventilator. See also IPPB unit, nebulizer.

respirator

A device used to facilitate respiration. See BagEasy respirator, HEPA respirator.

res·pi·ra·tor

(res'pir-ā'tŏr)
1. An appliance fitting over the mouth and nose, used to exclude dust, smoke, or other irritants, or otherwise alter the air before it enters the respiratory passages.
2. An apparatus for administering artificial respiration, especially for a prolonged period, in cases of paralysis or inadequate spontaneous ventilation.
See also: ventilator

respirator

1. Any mechanical device used to maintain the breathing and the supply of air or oxygen to the lungs. Most modern respirators are of the intermittent positive pressure type.
2. A filtering device that covers the face and removes toxic elements form the inspired air.

res·pi·ra·tor

(res'pir-ā'tŏr)
1. An apparatus for administering artificial respiration in cases of respiratory failure.
Synonym(s): ventilator.
2. An appliance fitting over the mouth and nose, used to exclude dust, smoke, or other irritants, or of otherwise altering air before it enters respiratory passages.
Synonym(s): inhaler (1) .

respirator (res´pirātur),

n an apparatus that qualifies the air breathed through it; a device for giving artificial respiration.

respirator

a device for giving artificial respiration or to assist in pulmonary ventilation. See also ventilator.

respirator shock
circulatory shock due to interference with the flow of blood through the great vessels and chambers of the heart, causing pooling of blood in the veins and the abdominal organs and a resultant vascular collapse. The condition sometimes occurs as a result of increased intrathoracic pressure in patients who are being maintained on a mechanical ventilator.

Patient discussion about respirator

Q. Help her to breathe. My sixteen year old cousin (girl) who is wondering if she is suffering from asthma, anxiety or both. She is thin, healthy girl and have been very worried She have asthma and have been thinking about it constantly. When she exercise, she get more out of breath, more worn out, and her heart beats faster than other people. Sometimes her chest hurts, but people tell me that is from my chest muscles being worked. She get a little dizzy also. When she go to bed at night sometimes it seems hard to breathe. She can take a deep breath and everything but it seems hard or something. I know there isn't anything wrong with my heart because she had an EKG done recently and chest x-rays. That was fine. When it is hot humid and muggy outside she find it hard to breath. Do you think she have asthma. She don't have any coughing or any known wheezing. Could thinking about every breath she take seem like she have asthma? She really want to know and me too, what is going on! Please help her to breathe!!!!

A. PS--alcohol and cigarettes can cause this problem to(drugs)mrfoot56.

Q. What causes bad breath? I have bad breath for a long time. What causes it?

A. Here are some causes of bad breath:
A Dry mouth- Saliva helps cleanse and moisten your mouth. A dry mouth enables dead cells to accumulate on your tongue, gums and cheeks. These cells then decompose and cause odor. Dry mouth naturally occurs during sleep. It's what causes "morning breath." Dry mouth is even more of a problem if you sleep with your mouth open. Some medications as well as smoking can lead to a chronic dry mouth, as can a problem with your salivary glands.
Some Diseases can also cause bad breath- Chronic lung infections and lung abscesses can produce very foul-smelling breath. Other illnesses, such as some cancers and certain metabolic disorders, can cause a distinctive breath odor. Kidney failure can cause a urine-like odor, and liver failure may cause an odor described as "fishy." People with uncontrolled diabetes often have a fruity breath odor. Chronic reflux of stomach acids from your stomach (gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD)

Q. How to get rid of bad breath? My wife complains that I have bad breath. How can I get rid of it?

A. Consider that candida infection can make your breath worse. You might try cutting down on sugar and carbs.

"Bad breath can also be caused by a candida (yeast infection), you may have a constant white furry tongue. Look at cutting down your intake of sugars and processed foods, as well as those containing yeast. - Search for Anti-Candida diet on a search engine for more info"
http://www.wikihow.com/Fix-Bad-Breath-on-the-Spot

More discussions about respirator
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, regardless of her particular initially favored option, the minimal required lifetime extension that each respondent would "demand" before accepting placement on a respirator could be placed on a common underlying scale, given this 30-day survival timeframe.
MacIntyre reported that use of N95 respirators led to statistically significant improvement in protection against viral infection, compared with the control, a loose-fitting cloth mask.
Some details of the developmental history of the Bang respirator (Figures 1, 2)
Each person shall demonstrate their capability to don and doff each type of respirator to be worn in the performance of normal and emergency duties including situations in which the respirator malfunctions.
Best Practice: MALS-31's 500 division, which has a light respirator workload, has a good idea.
There is also a longstanding recommendation for N95 FF respirator use for visitors of hospitalized patients with tuberculosis (8).
Integral to the Personal Protection Respirator is the development intention between Philips Electronics and Next Safety.
can be operated as either a powered or non-powered air purifying respirator, an open-circuit self-contained breathing apparatus or a supplied-air respirator.
There is no respirator selection table specific to Cr(VI) standards.
134: selection of respirators appropriate for hazard; medical evaluation of employees before respirator use; fit-testing procedures; correct usage, maintenance, and care of respirators; recognition of potential respiratory hazards for employees in health departments; and program evaluation.
Tokyo, Japan, Sept 6, 2005 - (JCNN) - Koken announced on September 5 that it has launched the BL-100H, a powered air-purifying respirator for handling and disposing asbestos, across Japan.