resorption


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Related to resorption: resorption atelectasis, Root resorption, Bone resorption, External resorption, fetal resorption, Tooth Resorption

resorption

 [re-sorp´shun]
1. the lysis and assimilation of a substance, as of bone.
Alveolor Resorption of the alveolar bone in periodontitis. From Darby and Walsh, 1995.

re·sorp·tion

(rē-sōrp'shŭn),
1. The act of resorbing.
2. A loss of substance by lysis, or by physiologic or pathologic means.

resorption

/re·sorp·tion/ (re-sorp´shun)
1. the lysis and assimilation of a substance, as of bone.

resorption

[risôrp′shən]
Etymology: L, resorbere, to swallow again
1 the loss of substance or bone by physiological or pathological means, such as the reduction of the volume and size of the residual ridge of the mandible or maxillae.
2 the cementoclastic and dentinoclastic action that may occur on a tooth root. Also called external resorption or internal resorption.

re·sorp·tion

(rē-sōrp'shŭn)
1. The act of resorbing.
2. A loss of substance by lysis, or by physiologic or pathologic means.

resorption

the taking back into an organism of any structure or secretion produced.

resorption

physiological or pathological loss of substance, e.g. loss of bone density, due to disuse atrophy or osteoporotic bone demineralization

re·sorp·tion

(rē-sōrp'shŭn)
Loss of substance by lysis, or by physiologic or pathologic means.

resorption (rēzôrp´shən),

n 1. loss of substance (bone) by physiologic or pathologic means; the reduction of the volume and size of the residual alveolar portion of the mandible or maxillae.
n 2. the cementoclastic and dentinoclastic action that often takes place on the root of a replanted tooth.
resorption, apical root,
n dissolution of the apex of a tooth, resulting in a shortened, blunted root.
resorption, bone,
n 1. destruction or solution of the elements of bone.
n 2. loss of bone resulting from the activity of multinucleated giant cells, the osteoclasts, which are noted in irregular concavities on the periphery of the bone (Howship's lacunae).
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Apical root resorption.
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Severe bone resorption in the mandible.
resorption, cemental,
n destruction of cementum by cementoclastic action. Noted as the presence of irregular concavities in the cemental surfaces.
resorption, frontal,
n osteoclastic resorption of alveolar bone (lamina dura) by multinucleated cells on the osseous margin adjacent to the periodontal ligament.
resorption, horizontal,
n a pattern of bone resorption in marginal periodontitis in which the marginal crest of the alveolar bone between adjacent teeth remains level; in these instances the bases of the periodontal pockets are supracrestal; a pattern of bone loss in which the crestal margins of the alveolar bone are resorbed. A horizontal pattern, rather than vertical loss along the root, is the typical type of bone loss in periodontitis.
n resorption that is not attributable to any known disease or is without an apparent cause.
resorption, internal,
n (idiopathic internal resorption, pink tooth), a special form of idiopathic root resorption from within the pulp cavity; granulation tissue is present within the tooth, apparently with the resportion of the dentin occurring from the inside outward. The cause is unknown.
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Internal resorption.
resorption, lacunar,
n loss of bone by cellular activity; osteoclasts are large, multinucleated cells seen in irregular concavities in the margin of the bone (Howship's lacunae) and currently believed to be directly responsible for the active destruction of bone.
resorption, pressure, of bone,
n osteoclastic destruction of bone resulting from the application of sustained, excessive force. Remodeling of bone may occur to better adapt to these forces, or destruction may continue if the stresses are repeated and excessive.
resorption, rear,
n See resorption, undermining.
resorption, root,
n destruction of the cementum or dentin by cementoclastic or osteoclastic activity.
resorption, surface root,
n localized resorptive areas on the cemental surface of the tooth root.
resorption, undermining,
n indirect, as opposed to frontal, removal of alveolar bone where pressure applied to a tooth has resulted in loss of vitality of localized areas of the periodontal ligament.
resorption, vertical,
n a pattern of bone loss seen in occlusal traumatism, marginal periodontitis, periodontosis, and other conditions; a pattern of bone loss in which the alveolar bone adjacent to a tooth is destroyed without simultaneous crestal loss, so that a vertical rather than a horizontal pattern of loss is observed.

resorption

1. the lysis and assimilation of a substance, as of bone or fetus.
2. reabsorption.

resorption-formation sequence
while bones are being formed for the first time the sequence is formation followed by resorption and modeling; in remodeling of an existing bone resorption occurs first and is then followed by bone formation.
resorption lacuna
concavities in bone created by osteoclasts.
resorption space
a continuous series of resoption lacunae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether patients delay tooth replacement altogether or opt for bridge-supported crowns or removable dentures, they may experience jaw bone resorption and a variety of complications.
The finite element model for bone resorption was shown in Figure 2.
A study of the passage of bone formation and resorption in abstinent alcoholics has found that eight weeks of abstinence may be enough to initiate a healthier balance between the two.
Icariin regulates osteoclast differentiation via the OPG/RANKL ratio, evoking a reparative effect on rapid palatal expansion induced root resorption in rats.
Markers representative of resorption such as multinucleated giant cells, osteoclasts and chronic inflammatory cells have been described in the histopathology reports in numerous case reports [Blackwood, 1958; Grundy et al.
Moreover, "the differential effects of nitroglycerin on formation and resorption appear to widen with time, suggesting that its efficacy continues or even increases during 24 months of use.
Although caries and resorption lesions may be detected with an explorer or a radiograph, treatments for these two dental diseases differ.
001) levels of esatradilo increased the osteoclastic bone resorption (sTRAP-5b and uCTX-I) at significant level (p<0.
In addition, cytokines may be involved in inhibiting new bone formation and stimulating bone resorption, therefore resulting in decreased BMD.
That concentration decreases over time because of dilution: early on from distribution of tracer through a series of progressively more slowly exchanging body compartments, but later because of addition of unlabeled calcium from diet and bony resorption.
With trabecular bone's increased surface area and increased resorption, it occurs after menopause that relatively more bone is lost from these areas, resulting in weakened trabeculae.
Soy protein has a greater effect on bone in postmenopausal women not on hormone replacement therapy, as evidenced by reducing bone resorption and urinary calcium excretion.