resin


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resin

 [rez´in]
1. a solid or semisolid organic substance exuded by plants or by insects feeding on plants, or produced synthetically; they are insoluble in water but mostly soluble in alcohol or ether. adj., adj res´inous.
2. a compound made by condensation or polymerization of low-molecular-weight organic compounds.
acrylic r's products of the polymerization of acrylic or methacrylic acid or their derivatives, used in fabrication of medical prostheses and dental restorations and appliances.
anion exchange resin see ion-exchange resin.
cation exchange resin see ion-exchange resin.
cholestyramine resin a synthetic, strongly basic anion exchange resin in the chloride form which chelates bile salts in the intestine, thus preventing their reabsorption; used as an adjunctive therapy to diet in management of certain hypercholesterolemias and in the symptomatic relief of pruritus associated with bile stasis.
composite resin a synthetic resin, usually acrylic based, to which a high percentage of ceramic reinforcing filler has been added, such as particles of glass or silica coated with a coupling agent to bind them to the matrix; used chiefly in dental restorations. Called also composite.
epoxy resin a tough, chemically resistant, adhesive, flexible, dimensionally stable resin of epoxy polymers; used as denture base material.
ion exchange resin a high-molecular-weight insoluble polymer of simple organic compounds capable of exchanging its attached ions for other ions in the surrounding medium; classified as (a)cation or anion exchange resins, depending on which ions the resin exchanges; and (b) carboxylic, sulfonic, and so on depending on the nature of the active groups.
podophyllum resin a mixture of resins from podophyllum, used as a topical caustic in treatment of laryngeal papillomas, condylomata acuminata, and other epitheliomas.

res·in

(rez'in, rŏz'),
1. An amorphous, brittle substance consisting of the hardened secretion of various plants, probably derived from a volatile oil and similar to a stearoptene.
2. Synonym(s): rosin
3. A precipitate formed by the addition of water to certain tinctures.
4. A broad term used to indicate organic substances (often polymeric) insoluble in water; the monomer's subunits are named according to their chemical composition, physical structure, and means of activation or curing, for example, acrylic resin, autopolymer resin.
[L. resina]

resin

/res·in/ (rez´in)
1. a solid or semisolid organic substance exuded by plants or by insects feeding on plants, or produced synthetically; they are insoluble in water but mostly soluble in alcohol or ether.
2. a compound made by condensation or polymerization of low-molecular-weight organic compounds.res´inous

acrylic resins  a class of thermoplastic resins produced by polymerization of acrylic or methacrylic acid or their derivatives; used in the fabrication of medical prostheses and dental restorations and appliances.
anion exchange resin  see ion exchange r.
cation exchange resin  see ion exchange r.
cholestyramine resin  a synthetic, strongly basic anion exchange resin in the chloride form which chelates bile acids in the intestine, thus preventing their reabsorption; used as an adjunctive therapy to diet in management of certain hypercholesterolemias and in the symptomatic relief of pruritus associated with bile stasis.
composite resin  a synthetic resin, usually acrylic based, to which a high percentage of inert filler has been added, e.g., coated glass or silica; used chiefly in dental restorations.
epoxy resin  a heat-set resin with toughness, adhesibility, chemical resistance, dielectric properties, and dimensional stability; several modified types are used as denture base material.
ion exchange resin  a high-molecular-weight insoluble polymer of simple organic compounds capable of exchanging its attached ions for other ions in the surrounding medium; classified as (a) cation or anion exchange r's, depending on which ions the resin exchanges; and (b) carboxylic, sulfonic, etc., depending on the nature of the active groups.
podophyllum resin  podophyllin; a mixture of resins from podophyllum, used as a topical caustic in the treatment of certain papillomas, condylomata acuminata, keratoses, and other epitheliomas.

resin

[rez′in]
Etymology: L, resina
1 a mixture of carboxylic acids, essential oils, and terpenes (hydrocarbons of the formula C10H16), occurring as exudations on various trees and shrubs or produced synthetically. Resins are highly combustible semisolids or amorphous solids that are insoluble in water, although some are soluble in ethanol and others in carbon tetrachloride, ether, and volatile oils. Most are soft and sticky but harden after exposure to cold.
2 any of a variety of solid or semisolid amorphous substances that are insoluble in organic solvents but not in water. Orally administered bile-acid binding resins such as cholestyramine and colestipol interrupt the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids and increase their excretion in the stool. Since bile acids are synthesized by the liver from cholesterol, the liver extracts more LDL cholesterol from the plasma to replace them, and, as a consequence, circulating levels of LDL cholesterol decrease.

res·in

(rez'in)
1. An amorphous brittle substance consisting of the hardened secretion of a number of plants, probably derived from a volatile oil and similar to a stearoptene.
2. Synonym(s): rosin.
3. A precipitate formed by the addition of water to certain tinctures.
4. A broad term used to indicate organic substances insoluble in water.
[L. resina]

resin

  1. any of a mixed group of compounds, including resin ACIDS, ESTERS and TERPENES that are found notably in plants, particularly trees and shrubs. Resins are often exuded from wounds, following injury or the infection of plants by, for example, FUNGI.
  2. a polymerized support used in, for example, CHROMATOGRAPHY.

res·in

(rez'in)
1. An amorphous, brittle substance consisting of hardened secretion of various plants, probably derived from a volatile oil and similar to a stearoptene.
2. Broad term for organic substances insoluble in water.
3. A precipitate formed by the addition of water to certain tinctures.
[L. resina]

resin

1. a solid or semisolid, amorphous organic substance of vegetable origin or produced synthetically. True resins are insoluble in water, but are readily dissolved in alcohol, ether and volatile oils.
2. rosin.

acrylic r's
products of the polymerization of acrylic or methacrylic acid or their derivatives and used in the fabrication of surgical prostheses and equipment.
anion-exchange resin
cation-exchange resin
cholestyramine resin
a synthetic, strongly basic anion-exchange resin in the chloride form which chelates bile salts in the intestine, thus preventing their reabsorption.
composite resin
usually a mixture of organic matrix and inorganic filler, used in restorative dentistry.
ipomoea resin, jalap resin, scammony resin
severe cathartics and irritants; little used because of their disastrous effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even if the cured resin is not hygroscopic, the original binder components usually are.
Type of resins: Acrylic-styrene emulsions; emulsions; UV curing resins; urethane/ polyurethane resins
It is said to be the first SL resin to be formulated with significantly reduced antimony content and conforms to FDA-approved USP Class VI testing for use in medical modeling and prototyping.
The shell process' chemistry is relatively simple: phenolic novolak resin and hexa are combined and coated on sand.
Eastman Chemical Company offers a wide variety of broad compatibility resin dispersions, resin intermediates and rosin resins to improve the functionality of coatings, adhesives and other products.
Stocks reprocessed and surplus virgin and off-grade resin, as well as regrind, film scrap, and other unground scrap.
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Here is a look at the latest offerings from select resins suppliers.
Unidirectional tape prepreg machines with on- or off-line resin film casting systems can be built in widths to 24 in.
After successful application of primer, the bonding resin is placed, air thinned and cured.
We prefer to use as much recycled film as possible," Vatuna says, "but have to use some post-industrial film and even some wide-spec or off-grade resin.
To be successful in today's tight market, foundries need a resin system that will make them more competitive as well as more profitable.