reserve


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reserve

 [re-zerv´]
1. to hold back for future use.
2. a supply beyond that ordinarily used, for use in an emergency.
alkali reserve (alkaline reserve) see alkali reserve.
cardiac reserve an increase in cardiac output related to an increase in heart rate or stroke volume to meet body requirements.

re·serve

(rĕ-zĕrv'),
Something available but held back for later use, as strength or carbohydrates.
[L. re-servo, to keep back, reserve]

reserve

/re·serve/ (re-zerv´)
1. to hold back for future use.
2. a supply, beyond that ordinarily used, which may be utilized in emergency.

alkali reserve , alkaline reserve the amount of conjugate base components of the blood buffers, the most important being bicarbonate.
cardiac reserve  potential ability of the heart to perform work beyond that necessary under basal conditions.
ovarian reserve  the number and quality of oocytes in the ovaries of a woman of childbearing age.

reserve

[rizurv′]
Etymology: L, reservare, to save
a potential capacity to maintain vital body functions in homeostasis by adjusting to increased need, such as cardiac reserve, pulmonary reserve, and alkali reserve. See also homeostasis.

reserve

Physiology A capacity or capability to be used in an emergency. See Cardiac reserve, Coronary vasodilator reserve, Resistance reserve.

re·serve

(rē-zĕrv')
Something available but held back for later use.
[L. re-servo, to keep back, reserve]

re·serve

(rē-zĕrv')
Something available but held back for later use.

reserve,

n something kept in store for future use.
reserve, alkali,
n See reserve, alkaline.
reserve, alkaline,
n (alkali reserve), 1. the amount of buffer compounds (e.g., sodium bicarbonate, dipotassium phosphate, proteins) in the blood capable of neutralizing acids; one of the buffer systems of the blood that can neutralize the acid valences formed in the body. It is made up of the base of weak acid salts and is usually measured by determining the bicarbonate concentration of the plasma.
n 2. the concentration of bicarbonate ions (HCO3) in the blood. These ions serve as a reserve in that they may be displaced by anions (e.g., Cl, SO4−2, PO4−3). Displacement of bicarbonate ions occurs mainly by means of the chloride shift. The role of the buffer system is such that a large influx of acid or base ions from either metabolic function or ingestion can be neutralized by the alkaline reserves from the mineral and protein salts in the blood and tissue fluids. A strong acid is transformed into a weak base. Consequently, the pH level of the blood fluctuates very little, and the tissue cells are constantly bathed in a continuously buffered solution.
reserve, cardiac,
n the reserve strength or pumping ability of the heart, which may be called on in an emergency.

reserve

1. to hold back for future use.
2. a supply, beyond that ordinarily used, that may be utilized in emergency.

alkali reserve, alkaline reserve
the amount of buffer compounds in the blood that are capable of neutralizing acids, such as sodium bicarbonate and proteins. See also alkali reserve.
cardiac reserve
the potential ability of the heart to perform work beyond that necessary under basal conditions. See also cardiac reserve.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's a good relationship between the reserves and active duty," Palacios said, explaining that the training intent is to provide Soldiers an idea of how to do operations and ensure that reservists are up to speed with the latest in technology and process.
In urban areas, departments use reserve officers to assist with traffic and crowd control during public events, such as concerts and parades.
If this recovery factor can be increased by another five percentage points, that would boost worldwide recoverable reserves by more than all of Saudi Arabia's current proven reserves.
Reinsurance Trust Agreement: The captive insurer establishes a trust (the "reinsurance trust") and transfers to the reinsurance trust for the sole benefit of the ceding insurer some or all of the proceeds, as necessary, raised from the issuance of the surplus notes in an amount equal to the redundant reserve, plus proceeds required for the economic reserve.
Hall did not say how soon those Guard and Reserve troops would be demobilized or in what numbers.
This reserve's impressive benefits have "paved the way for a national network of marine reserves that is now being built in New Zealand," Roberts observes.
Congress intended for companies to use statutory reserves for purposes of the qualification test.
This was when the "all events" test was met (under which a deduction can be taken when all events have occurred establishing the fact of a liability, and the liability's amount can be determined with reasonable accuracy), since it was the time the FSLIC conclusively exercised its authority to extinguish the reserve.
Figure 4-1: Proved Conventional Oil Reserves Using Traditional Calculation
You assume that so much of the business will lapse over time, then you can reduce the reserve by the amount of that lapse.
College of the Canyons offers academy training classes twice a year, and for each reserve group there's additional training.
Because of our operation tempo and the anticipated utilization of Army Reserve units in future MTMC operations worldwide," said Daugherty, "it just plain makes sense to bring on board more full time reservists if possible.