reserpine


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reserpine

 [res´er-pēn]
a rauwolfia alkaloid, administered orally and intramuscularly as an antihypertensive agent.

re·ser·pine

(rē-sĕr'pēn, -pin),
An ester alkaloid isolated from the root of certain species of Rauwolfia; it decreases the 5-hydroxytryptamine and catecholamine concentrations in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues; formerly used in conjunction with other agents in the management of essential hypertension and as a tranquilizer in psychotic states.

reserpine

/re·ser·pine/ (rĕ-ser´pēn) an alkaloid from various species of Rauwolfia; used as an antihypertensive.

reserpine

(rĭ-sûr′pēn′, -pĭn, rĕs′ər-pĭn, -pēn′, rĕz′-)
n.
A drug, C33H40N2O9, isolated from the roots of certain species of rauwolfia and used as an antihypertensive.

reserpine

[res′ərpēn]
a depleter of biogenic amines (e.g., norepinephrine, dopamine) from nerve terminals.
indications It is prescribed in the treatment of mild to moderate high blood pressure and has unlabeled uses for tardive dyskinesia and certain neuropsychiatric disorders.
contraindications Mental depression, peptic ulcer, ulcerative colitis, or known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use.
adverse effects Among the more serious adverse effects are mental depression, extrapyramidal effects, impotence, aggravation of peptic ulcer, and paradoxical excitement.

reserpine

Therapeutics A Rauwolfia–derived alkaloid that ↑ CNS 5-HT and catecholamine concentrations, used for HTN, mild anxiety

re·ser·pine

(rē-sĕr'pēn)
An ester alkaloid isolated from certain species of Rauwolfia; decreases 5-hydroxytryptamine and catecholamine concentrations in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues.

reserpine

A RAUWOLFIA alkaloid that decreases the concentration of the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine in the nervous system and has a sedative, ANTIHYPERTENSIVE and tranquillizing effect. The drug is on the WHO official list.

reserpine

an alkaloid extracted from a species ofRauwolfia, that is used as a sedative and as an antihypersensitive agent to reduce hypertension.

Reserpine (Serpasil)

A drug prescribed for high blood pressure.

reserpine

agent used to manage essential hypertension, and as a tranquillizer in psychotic states; it promotes hypotension

reserpine, (res´ərpēn),

n brand names: Serpalan, Serpasil;
drug class: antiadrenergic agent, antihypertensive;
action: depletes catecholamine stores in central nervous system and adrenergic nerve endings;
use: hypertension.

reserpine

an active alkaloid from various species of Rauwolfia, used as an antihypertensive, tranquilizer and sedative. Little used in veterinary medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: The lack of cross-resistance to most resistance mechanisms and the collateral sensitivity in EGFRtransfectants compared to wild-type cells speak for a promising role of reserpine in cancer chemotherapy.
Low-level lincosamide resistance suggests the presence of some efflux mechanism, even if no inhibition by reserpine was observed.
Notably, reserpine irreversibly blocks the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2), and there is evidence that reserpine also inhibits DAT (Metzger et al.
Reserpine, diuretics, [beta]-blockers, ACE inhibitors, and calcium antagonists have been implicated in retrospective studies or subgroup analyses from prospective intervention trials, the investigators said (Lancet 358[9281]:539-44, 2001).
Reserpine, in doses of 4-6 mg/day, shows promise in the treatment of schizophrenia.
Determining MIC to ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ethidium bromide, and acriflavine in the presence or absence of reserpine showed greater than fourfold MIC decreases in the presence of reserpine, both in the CipR-71 strain and in the two transformants obtained when chromosomal DNA was used as donor, which indicates the existence of an efflux mechanism (data not shown).
Peripherally acting antiadrenergic agents, like reserpine, are rarely used in pregnancy, so experience is limited and there are better-tolerated agents.
Many articles have reported augmentation when reserpine is combined with D2-blocking antipsychotics.
TABLE Physiologic, pharmacologic, and pathologic causes of an elevated serum prolactin level (1) PHYSIOLOGIC Pregnancy Ectopic pregnancy Lactation Nipple stimulation Stress Sleep disorder PHARMACOLGIC Dopamine receptor antagonists: phenothiazines, butyrophenones, thioxanthene, risperidone, metoclopramide, sulpiride, pimozide Dopamine-depleting agents: [alpha]-methyldopa, reserpine Hormones: estrogens, antiandrogens Others: danazol, isoniazid, verapamil, cyproheptadine, opiates, H2-blockers (cimetidine), cocaine and marijuana, tricyclic antidepressants PATHOLOGIC Acromegaly Alcoholic cirrhosis Chest wall trauma or tumor Herpes zoster Hypothalamic and pituitary stalk disease Hypothyroidism Pituitary tumors: prolactinomas, adenomas Polycystic ovarian syndrome Renal failure Sarcoidosis
Determination of an eventual active efflux mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance was carried out by MIC determination in the presence and absence of carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenyl (CCCP) and reserpine in all three clinical strains (9).
Other medications (oral contraceptives, verapamil, methyldopa, reserpine, triptorelin, bendroflumethiazide)