reserpine


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reserpine

 [res´er-pēn]
a rauwolfia alkaloid, administered orally and intramuscularly as an antihypertensive agent.

re·ser·pine

(rē-sĕr'pēn, -pin),
An ester alkaloid isolated from the root of certain species of Rauwolfia; it decreases the 5-hydroxytryptamine and catecholamine concentrations in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues; formerly used in conjunction with other agents in the management of essential hypertension and as a tranquilizer in psychotic states.

reserpine

/re·ser·pine/ (rĕ-ser´pēn) an alkaloid from various species of Rauwolfia; used as an antihypertensive.

reserpine

(rĭ-sûr′pēn′, -pĭn, rĕs′ər-pĭn, -pēn′, rĕz′-)
n.
A drug, C33H40N2O9, isolated from the roots of certain species of rauwolfia and used as an antihypertensive.

reserpine

[res′ərpēn]
a depleter of biogenic amines (e.g., norepinephrine, dopamine) from nerve terminals.
indications It is prescribed in the treatment of mild to moderate high blood pressure and has unlabeled uses for tardive dyskinesia and certain neuropsychiatric disorders.
contraindications Mental depression, peptic ulcer, ulcerative colitis, or known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use.
adverse effects Among the more serious adverse effects are mental depression, extrapyramidal effects, impotence, aggravation of peptic ulcer, and paradoxical excitement.

reserpine

Therapeutics A Rauwolfia–derived alkaloid that ↑ CNS 5-HT and catecholamine concentrations, used for HTN, mild anxiety

re·ser·pine

(rē-sĕr'pēn)
An ester alkaloid isolated from certain species of Rauwolfia; decreases 5-hydroxytryptamine and catecholamine concentrations in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues.

reserpine

A RAUWOLFIA alkaloid that decreases the concentration of the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine in the nervous system and has a sedative, ANTIHYPERTENSIVE and tranquillizing effect. The drug is on the WHO official list.

reserpine

an alkaloid extracted from a species ofRauwolfia, that is used as a sedative and as an antihypersensitive agent to reduce hypertension.

Reserpine (Serpasil)

A drug prescribed for high blood pressure.

reserpine

agent used to manage essential hypertension, and as a tranquillizer in psychotic states; it promotes hypotension

reserpine, (res´ərpēn),

n brand names: Serpalan, Serpasil;
drug class: antiadrenergic agent, antihypertensive;
action: depletes catecholamine stores in central nervous system and adrenergic nerve endings;
use: hypertension.

reserpine

an active alkaloid from various species of Rauwolfia, used as an antihypertensive, tranquilizer and sedative. Little used in veterinary medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reserpine is the most widely studied indole alkaloid found in this plant.
The use of reserpine as an antihypertensive has become unpopular, owing to its side-effect profile, most notably the development of depressive symptoms.
10) A breakthrough study by the US Veterans Administration (VA) found that lowering BP in patients with hypertension (diastolic BP 90-114 mm Hg) using thiazide-type diuretics, reserpine, and hydralazine significantly reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality compared with placebo.
It contains a compound called reserpine, which is now used in the treatment of insomnia, schizophrenia, high blood pressure and even nervous disorders.
This paper was presented at the conference "Rethinking Structural Reform in Latin America," cosponsored by the Federal Reserpine Bank of Atlanta and the IDB.
Reserpine blocks vesicular storage of NE by blocking the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) that is located on secretory vesicles.
One of the earliest models of depression was built from the clinical observation that more than 10 percent of patients taking the antihypertension drug reserpine develop some symptoms of depression.
Other common drugs that can provoke similar symptoms are aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, beta blockers (oral and ophthalmic), bromocriptine, estrogens, oral contraceptives, prazosin, methyladopa, phentolamine, guanethidine, reserpine, and tricyclic antidepressants.
In the early 1960s, the American chemist, Robert Woodward, won the Nobel Prize for his many contributions to organic chemistry, including, in particular, the synthesis of natural products such as reserpine and chlorophyll.
Peripherally acting antiadrenergic agents, like reserpine, are rarely used in pregnancy so experience is limited and there are better-tolerated agents.
1988), calcium channel blockers (Bansal, 1998), clonidine (Hogan, Wallin, & Baer, 1980), hydralazine, and reserpine, are all known to be associated with ED.
These drags include the major tranquilizers trifluoperazine (Stelazine) and haloperidol (Haldol); metoclopramide (Reglan), used to treat gastroesophageal reflux and the nausea caused by certain cancer drugs; and less often, alpha methyldopa and reserpine, used to control hypertension.