resedation

resedation

(rē″sĕ-dā′shŭn) [″ + ″]
Succumbing to the effects of a sedative, hypnotic, or anesthetic drug after the drug's action has been reversed with its antagonist. The effect may occur because the half-life of the drug exceeds that of the antagonist (e.g., when the drug re-enters the bloodstream after it is released from storage in fatty tissues).

CAUTION!

Because many sedative/hypnotic drugs, anesthetics, or narcotic analgesics may redistribute into the blood after their effects have been temporarily reversed, patients who have received these drugs should be monitored for several hours to ensure that they are maintaining an alert mental status, an open airway, and effective respiration.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1 mg/kg) caused rapid and complete antagonism of midazolam (6 mg/kg IM) in less than 2 minutes, and no resedation was reported.
Additional benefits of Diprivan include the ability for easy resedation of patients, a quicker awakening, and excellent hemodynamic stability.