resect

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resect

 [re-sekt´]
to excise part of an organ or other structure.

re·sect

(rē-sekt'),
1. To cut off or remove, especially to cut off the articular ends of one or both bones forming a joint.
2. To excise a segment of a part.
[L. re-seco, pp. sectus, to cut off]

resect

/re·sect/ (-sekt´) to excise part or all of an organ or other structure.

resect

(rĭ-sĕkt′)
tr.v. re·sected, re·secting, re·sects
To perform a resection on.

re·sect′a·bil′i·ty n.
re·sect′a·ble adj.

resect

verb To remove or excise tissue or part (or all) of an organ.

re·sect

(rē-sekt')
1. To cut off, especially to cut off the articular ends of one or both bones, forming a joint.
2. To excise a segment of a part.
[L. re-seco, pp. sectus, to cut off]

Resect

To remove surgically.

resect

to excise part of an organ or other structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The limitation to four visible metastases, however, was not meant as a definition of resectability but only as a clear criterion for inclusion [10].
True determination of resectability of borderline tumors will be made at the time of laporotomy.
Cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy using the BEP regimen (bleomycin, etoposide, cisplatin) was commenced 7--14 days postoperatively in 10 patients, while 2 patients with scrotal skin involvement received neo-adjuvant BEP to achieve tumour mobility and resectability.
Offering a 'potent' chemotherapy as first-line treatment is likely to be the best means of improving subsequent resectability in patients who are initially marginally unresectable.
The primary end-point of Paragon II will be tumour resectability at surgery,
The first step is to stage the disease using MRI, isotope studies and CT to determine the extent of local infiltration and resectability of the tumour and the presence of metastases.
The superior survival in the PET-defined early metabolic responders can probably be explained by their more radical resectability and more favorable lymph node-based tumor staging, according to Dr.
Neoadjuvant chemotherapy typically yields a low response rate, and no large trial to date has demonstrated a clear benefit on patient's survival or resectability rate of the cancer.
The prognosis does, however, depend on the location and resectability of the tumor.
Diagnosis patterns of NSCLC including stage distribution and extent of resectability based on a survey of 180 physicians across the seven markets
Important concepts include: (i) the use of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in individuals with fixed or relapsed lymph nodes to improve resectability and outcome; (ii) the use of taxane- and cisplatin-containing chemotherapeutic regimen with TIP as an emerging preferred regimen; (iii) the use of chemotherapy in patients with pN2 or pN3 disease following lymph node dissection; and (iv) the similarities between penile cancers and squamous cancers of the head and neck may allow further exploration of EGFR targeted therapies.
57) Overall, both CT and MRI are reasonably accurate in assessing resectability, but not in assessing non-resectability.

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